Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
Scroll to top

Top

200+ Haunted Places in Kent (Updated 2017)

| On 05, Apr 2017

 

Table of Contents

House of Agnes Hotel, Canterbury

You’ll find the historic House of Agnes hotel along St Dunstan’s Street in Canterbury.

The Grade II* listed building dates back to the 15th century.

It gets its name from a former 19th century resident Agnes Wickfield.

If you’re a fan of Charles Dickens you may remember that the house was mentioned in his book David Copperfield!

Paranormal activity has been reported to take place within the House of Agnes in the past…

In the 1990s a guest staying in one of the rooms overlooking the garden reported hearing his bedroom door slamming shut over and over again.

When he got up to investigate he found that the door was firmly locked shut!

One night a former manager was locking up and heard someone fall over in the toilets.

Concerned for the person he went to investigate but found that the toilets were empty but freezing cold.

As he went to leave he heard a cubicle door slam shut behind him but as he turned around he discovered both cubicle doors open.

As he walked towards the cubicles the toilet door slammed shut, the lights went off and he felt something push past him and exit the toilet!

Click Here to Stay the Night at the House of Agnes

 

Greyfriars Lodge, Canterbury

The Greyfriars Lodge along Stour Street is said to be haunted…

Guests have reported suddenly temperature drops in their room at night.

And have been awoken in the early hours of the morning when their bedsheets have been pulled off them by something unseen.

One poor little girl awoke in the middle of the night to see two red eyes staring down at her from the ceiling!

Click Here to Stay the Night at Greyfriars Lodge

 

Elvey Farm, Pluckley

Elvey Farm is located in the middle of the Kent countryside close to the village.

The 15th century farm building is said to be haunted by Edward Brett who was a farmer who tragically shot himself dead in the farm’s dairy.

His ghostly apparition has been seen throughout the building and grounds by terrified witnesses.

Eerie whispering has also been heard in the farm’s dairy which is believed to be whispered by the ghost of Edward.

Click Here to Book a Night at the Elvey Farm Hotel

 

Larkfield Priory Hotel, Aylesford

Larkfield Priory Hotel is just off the London Road in Aylesford.

The original Larkfield House was built on an area known as Larkfield Farm and was the home of Reverend William Lewis Wigan.

The house was burnt to the ground in 1890 but was rebuilt into the building you see today.

Apparently, before the manor house, the site was home to a priory as well as a gallows!

The hotel is said to be haunted by a maid called Charlotte.

It’s said that Charlotte died as a result of a botch abortion attempt after falling pregnant by the groundskeeper.

Her ghostly apparition is often seen in the grounds of the hotel!

Click Here to Book a Night at the Larkfield Priory Hotel

 

The Lower Bell Inn, Maidstone

The Lower Bell Inn is an old pub which dates back to 1865 that you’ll find situated on the North Downs Pilgrims Ways just off the A229.

The building was originally a farm estate’s manager house with stables at the back.

The pub has a reputation for being haunted…

During the 1990s the then manager of the Lower Bell was interviewed by a paranormal TV program.

The poor man divulge that one morning when he was entering the cellar something unseen suddenly pushed him down the stairs which resulted in him falling badly and breaking his shoulder blade!

He also remarked that the cellar often had cold spots.

And that the lights would switch themselves on and off on their own accord.

The gas in the cellar would also be turned off on its own accord but instead of being only hand tight he found that it had been turned off so tightly that it needed a couple of whacks with a hammer to loosen it!

Click Here To Stay At The Lower Bell Inn…

 

Ferry House Inn, Harty

In 1854 a local man called Coleman tragically drowned in the Swale Estuary when his boat capsized.

Paranormal investigators held a vigil at the Inn in 2004.

They recorded eerie banging noises coming from the pub’s cellar as well as capturing a photo of a ghostly man sitting at a table.

They believed that spirit man they’ve photographed was the ghost of the drowned Coleman.

Spooked members of staff have reported that they’ve felt an unseen presence watching them whilst they did their work.

In 2013 the pub held a psychic evening which revealed that the inn had spirits of people who tragically died in a fire which took place at the inn a couple of centuries ago.

Click Here to Stay at the Ferry House Inn

 

The Bowl Inn, Charing

Just off the Stalisfield Road to the north of the Kent village of Charing you’ll find the historic Bowl Inn.

The pub dates back to 1512 when it started life out as a farmhouse.

A former landlady of the Bowl Inn reported that the building had an eerie story attached to it.

She said that the sound of phantom children crying had been heard coming from the pub’s old inglenook fireplace.

Local legend says that when the plague swept through Charing many of its victim’s bodies where flung into the fire!

It’s been reported that the room above the old fireplace have a strange atmosphere to it and may actually be haunted by a ghost.

Click Here to Stay at the Bowl Inn

 

Woolpack Inn, Chilham

You’ll find the Grade II listed Woolpack Inn in the Kentish chocolate box village of Chilham.

The six hundred year old inn is a stone’s throw away from the Norman Chilham Castle.

The Woolpack Inn is said to be haunted by the Grey Lady…

Her ghostly apparition has been seen wandering around the hotel.

And she’s said to be friendly by those who have witnessed her!

Click Here to Book a Night at the Woolpack Inn

 

Dover Castle, Dover

The impressive 12th century Dover castle is the largest castle in England.

It’s believed that there’s been a fortified structure at the castle’s location since the Iron Age.

The castle is a Grade I listed building and Scheduled Monument.

It’s run by English Heritage, so you can pay it a visit if you fancy having a look around.

The medieval castle was built by King Henry II between 1180 and 1185.

During the Napoleonic Wars at the end of the 18th century, the castle was strengthened with barrack tunnels being built underneath it.

Not only were the tunnels used in the Napoleonic Wars but they were used during the Second World War as a communication centre, air raid shelter and underground hospital.

With such a long and eventful history it’s no wonder that the castle is said to have the odd ghost or two knocking about the place…

In fact, the TV show Most Haunted conducted a live investigation from Dover Castle in December 2002!

The castle’s battlements are said to be haunted by the ghost of a drummer boy who was robbed and murdered there…

His murders were said to have actually decapitated him!

His ghost is often seen and heard drumming away throughout the castle.

The ghostly apparitions of a cavalier and also a woman in a red dress are often seen by terrified witnesses in the castle’s keep.

The secret underground tunnels are also said to be awash with ghostly servicemen from the Second World War still carrying out their war time duties.

 

Hever Castle, Hever

The 13th century Hever Castle is located in the Kent village of Hever.

It’s famous for being the family home to the Boleyns from 1462 to 1539.

After the Boleyns, the castle passed through many owners including Anne of Cleves, the Waldegraves, the Meade Waldos and in 1903 it was restored by the American millionaire William Waldorf Astor.

Today it’s owned by a private company who run it as a conference centre.

But the good news is… it’s also opened to the public if you fancy having a look around the place!

With such a rich history it’s no wonder that Hever Castle has a reputation for being haunted…

The ghost of Anne Boleyn is said to wander the grounds of Hever Castle, it’s said that her ghostly apparition is most likely to be seen on Christmas Eve.

An apparition of a man is often seen in one of the castle’s bedroom…

Some say that the figure is King Henry VIII himself whilst others say it’s an angry old man.

The long Gallery is said to be haunted by a poltergeist who likes to throw objects about and a man on horseback which is weird because the room is on the second floor of the castle!

 

Fort Amherst, Chatham

The Plotting Room at the fort is said to be haunted by a faceless ghost…

Terrified witnesses reported the ghostly male figure as being dressed in a Victorian long dark coat and a black top hat!

Next to the Plotting Room is the Communication Room…

One day during a tour of the fort, the guide noticed that one of his group had been left behind in the Communication Room.

He returned to the room to discover that the woman was chatting away on one of the old phones.

When she hung up, she told him that the phone rung so she answered it and a woman on the other end of the phone told her that a bomb had dropped on her house.

The weird thing was…

The old phone was just a prop, which meant it wasn’t connected to an outside line!

One ghost story associated with the fort’s tunnels concerns an electrician who got the shock of his life whilst working there one day.

He was up a ladder when he heard a fire bucket fall to the ground behind him…

He turned around to witness the bucket moving on its own accord across the floor.

Thinking that someone was playing a trick on him he got down from his ladder to explore the area more when suddenly the fire bucket just flew across the room at great speed!

One of the fort’s passageways is said to be haunted by the ghost of a young boy who likes to pull at the skirts of young women visiting the tunnels.

Some visitors to this area have also reported hearing the sound of phantom drumming.

The Lighting Shaft is said to be haunted by a female ghost which the members of staff have nicknamed Lily of the Valley.

She’s said to manifest from the white door on the right side of the passage.

She described as wearing a dress from the Georgian period but strangely men witnesses describe her as being very beautiful whilst female witnesses say she’s ugly as sin!

Weddings were once performed on the Lower Gun Floor…

One day, stunned guests at a wedding ceremony were shocked to see a ghostly figure of a soldier in a red jacket manifest and walk straight through the bride, groom and guests as though they weren’t there!

Dark shadowy figures and phantom voices have been reported throughout the fort.

And strangely… the upsetting sound of women and children crying has also been heard!

In fact, some visitors to the fort have reported to discover small children’s dusty hand prints on their clothing after exiting the fort’s tunnels.

 

Fort Horsted, Chatham

Local legend says that the dark tunnels of Fort Horsted are patrolled by a large ghostly dog which has a black shaggy coat.

Terrified witnesses have also reported seeing shadowy figure within the tunnels.

The ghostly apparitions of a mother and her daughter have been seen by spooked witnesses walking around the grounds of the fort.

Apparently they’re dressed in old fashioned clothing!

Some visitors to the fort have even reported hearing the spooky voice of a little girl.

In fact, a lot of visitors to the fort say that its energy makes them feel uncomfortable, ill and extremely nervous.

Some of the fort’s security guards have remarked that they really don’t like patrolling certain areas of the building at night!

Guests visiting the fort’s tunnels have reported hearing phantom footsteps walking towards them only to see nobody appear.

The fort offers ghost hunting tours which in the past have recorded EVPs of men, women and even children!

 

Chatham Dockyard, Chatham

A headless ghost of a young boy has been seen by terrified witnesses wandering near to the Ropery building during the night.

Apparently he’s the ghost of a drummer boy called George Stock who was brutally murdered and nearly decapitated by a Royal Marine called James Toothe!

The Ropery building is also said to be haunted by the ghosts of children known as Bobbin Boys.

The Joiner’s Shop at the dockyard dates back to 1790.

It’s said to be haunted by a dark shadowy figure which has been known to rush at visitors.

The sound of phantom horses outside the Joiner’s Shop has also been reported by witnesses visiting the building.

The Sail and Colour Loft dates back to 1723.

The building is said to be haunted by the ghost of a Grey Lady who’s often seen hovering a foot above the floor of the loft.

She’s described as a well-dressed lady in a long flowing garment who’s often accompanied by the smell of lavender.

She’s believed to be a former supervisor who once worked in the loft.

Former machinists often reported being touched on their shoulder by something unseen whist they were making sails and flags.

Many members of staff refused to be in that room alone!

The Grade I listed early 18th century Commissioner’s House is said to be very haunted indeed…

Witnesses have reported seeing the ghostly apparition of another Grey Lady wandering along the landing and standing on the staircase.

Visitors to the house have also reported seeing the ghostly apparition of three young boys and two girls on the staircase of the house.

Peter Pett was Master Shipwright and Second Resident Commissioner of Chatham Dockyard during the 17th century.

He was blamed and humiliated for not protecting the English Fleet during the Dutch Raid on the Medway in 1667.

His ghost is said to haunt the Commissioner’s House!

A ghostly woman in a long dress was witnessed in the 1990s crossing the Sunne Room heading for the servants’ stairs.

Legend says that a young pregnant girl tragically hung herself on the servants’ stairs of the house after she discovered that her sweetheart was lost at sea!

Her ghost is now said to haunt the upper floor of the house.

Many terrified witnesses have reported hearing the phantom screams of a young woman in that part of the building.

Other witnesses have also reported seeing a ghostly woman peering out off one of the Revenge Room windows!

Guests visiting the Commissioner’s House garden reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a young teenage girl standing on the lawn.

She walked through the gate of the garden and disappeared into thin air!

One night in 1957 a member of staff at the house saw the ghosts of two cavaliers from the English Civil War era having an argument on the garden lawn…

As he approached them they vanished into the night’s air!

The Nursery Room in the attic is said to be haunted by the ghost of a young girl…

She’s been described as having blonde hair, wearing a white dress and is aged between seven and nine years old.

The ghost of an old lady in black is also said to haunt the attic!

In 2004 a couple saw the apparitions of a man in a double button jacket and a woman sitting in a chair eeriely staring at them from one of the Commissioner’s House’s windows.

The early 19th century Smithery which was used for the production of anchors and chains is said to be haunted by a ghost that was blamed for pushing a poor cleaner whilst she was working.

She was so terrified by the scary event that she never returned to work at the dockyards again!

 

Theatre Royal, Chatham

The Theatre Royal’s most famous ghost is that of Humphrey…

Legend says that Humphrey was a former trapeze artist who made a couple of errors during his act in front of Edward VII.

He was so humiliated by his bad performance that he committed suicide by hanging himself from the dress circle!

But there’s also an alternative story which says that Humphrey is the ghost of a former actor called Frisby Bracknol who was sacked from the theatre in 1907 for being constantly drunk.

It’s said that he was found hanging in one of the circle boxes a week later!

Spooked witnesses would often catch the ghostly apparition of Humphrey watching the performances at the theatre.

It’s said that if he liked the show he would stay to the end but if he didn’t he would walk out.

The most common place witnesses saw the ghostly Humphrey was in the dress circle.

Most witnesses described him as being a happy ghost with a kind looking face.

Members of staff thought of him as a guardian of the theatre.

The theatre was also believed to be haunted by a ghostly woman in a long evening dress, the ghost of an old lady often seen on the ground floor, the spirit of a little girl in the toilets, the ghost of a former employee called Charlie Monks and last but not least there was the ghostly Green Man.

The Green Man was said to haunt one of the boxes which overlooks the stage.

Apparently he was dressed from head to toe in green… a green suit, a green shirt and a green tie!

The ghostly little girl in the toilets was often blamed for opening and shutting cubicle doors, unwinding toilet rolls and throwing hand soap on the floor.

Phantom footsteps, the smell of old fashioned tobacco smoke, doors banging shut on their own accord, ghostly voices, tables and chairs being mysteriously upturned were just some of the paranormal activity reported to have taken place within the old theatre!

 

Brook Theatre, Chatham

The basement of the theatre is said to have bricked up tunnels which at one time were connected to the Naval Hospital beside the Great Lines and to the Dockyard via Fort Amherst.

Terrified members of staff often reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a nurse in an old fashioned uniform wandering around the building.

Ghostly soldiers have also been seen in the basement of the building by spooked witnesses.

Unfortunately, due to the public nature of the building many of the ghost stories concerning it has been muted as not to scare off visitors.

But I’m sure that many more ghostly stories will come to light over the coming years!

Just behind the Brook Theatre along Whiffen’s Avenue you’ll find the Town Hall gardens.

The Town Hall gardens are actually an old burial ground which was first opened in 1828 to elevate the overcrowded St Mary’s churchyard in Dock Road.

The gardens are said to be haunted by the ghostly apparition of a young woman dressed in a white gown who’s said to wander near the old gravestones.

She’s been nicknamed as the Lady of the Tombstones as nobody actually knows of her true identity!

 

Cranbrook Road, Benenden

Back in the early 1900s a man was riding his bike along the Cranbrook Road when he noticed that he was being following by a rather grotesque apparition…

The ghostly figure was said to have the body of a dog and the head of a man!

Some believe that the grotesque ghost has something to do with a hideous murder of a man in the area many centuries ago.

The Cranbrook Road is also said to be haunted by the ghost of a jilted bride who found out that her bridegroom was having an affair with her sister on her wedding day!

Legend says that she tragically committed suicide by drowning herself in a nearby pond soon after hearing the bad news.

Shortly afterwards the unfaithful bridegroom would report that every time he returned from Cranbrook market the ghost of his jilted bride would manifest next to him on his cart and remain there until he reached home!

 

St Lawrence Church, Bidborough

Back in 1998 two visitors to the church got the shock of their lives when they witnessed three ghostly monks gliding down the pathway towards them at a rapid pace.

Apparently the phantom monks were all hooded and where their faces should’ve been a strange glowing light emitted outwards.

As you can imagine, the visitors were scared witless and they fled from the churchyard in terror!

Bravely they stayed outside the church’s ground to see if the ghostly monks would follow them but they never did.

 

All Saints Church, Brenchley

Brenchley’s 13th century All Saints Church is well-known locally for its beautiful avenue of four hundred year old yew trees.

Back in the summer of 1988 a visitor to the church was wandering around its churchyard looking at the gravestones when suddenly he felt as though he wasn’t alone.

He looked up and saw an apparition of a Roman soldier manifest in front of him.

Apparently the Roman was young with a fair face and was wearing a helmet.

And he was staring at one of the gravestones in the churchyard.

The visitor started to approach the phantom soldier to get a better look at him but as he did the apparition suddenly disappeared into thin air!

 

Maidstone Road, Brenchley

In the winter of 2009 a driver was travelling along the Maidstone Road in the early hours of the morning when suddenly he had to brake hard.

You see, two ghostly figures had rushed out in front of his vehicle scaring the life out of him only to vanish into thin air when he’d came to a halt!

 

The Halfway House, Brenchley

Just outside the village along the Horsmonden Road you’ll come across the 17th century Halfway House pub.

Former landlords and regulars alike have for years said that the pub is haunted…

The pub is a former coaching inn and was also once used as a morgue!

Table and chairs being mysteriously moved, tankards moving on their own accord across the bar and a phantom bar bell being rung are just some of the paranormal events reported to have taken place within the pub by its spooked members of staff.

A former chef at the pub was scared witless one day when he heard the sound of what he thought were coffins being dragged about the first floor!

Local legend says that the pub is haunted by the ghost of an old lady.

 

Glassenbury Park, Cranbrook

Glassenbury Park is a beautiful Grade II* listed manor house situated to the west of Cranbrook.

The originally house was a lodge which was rebuilt in the 1470s for Walter Roberts and then again in the 1730s for Sir Walter Roberts.

The house was the family home of the Roberts for many centuries.

A forlorn female ghost from the Roberts family is said to haunt the area around the house looking for her dead husband.

Local legend says that her newly wedded husband was thrown from a horse and killed whilst they were on their way to their honeymoon.

 

St Dunstan’s Church, Cranbrook

Bloody Baker was the nickname for the 16th century politician Sir John Baker.

He was called this due to his brutal prosecution of Protestants.

There was once a room above the south porch of Cranbrook’s St Dunstan’s Church which was called Baker’s Hole or Baker’s Jail after the politician.

Legend says that this room was once used to house prisoners.

And on quiet dark nights the cries and moans of their spirits can still be heard!

 

Pest House, Cranbrook

On Frythe Walk there’s a 16th century house called Pest House.

It’s said that it was once used to house plague victims and many of them were buried in its cellar.

The house is said to be haunted by a ghost of a woman.

One visitor to the house saw the ghostly apparition of a middle-aged woman carrying an oil lamp in one of the bedrooms.

The middle-aged woman is believed to be that of Theresa Benenden who tragically committed suicide by hanging herself in the cellar.

Some people believe that Theresa Benenden is the also the ghost of the pretty woman who was seen in the 1970s.

The ghost manifested by the inglenook fireplace and drifted across the room to the stairs where she disappeared into thin air.

Another time in the 1970s a young boy saw a ghostly couple on the landing of the house who then proceeded to vanished into thin air.

The same boy also saw the apparition of a tall lady in his bedroom!

 

Angley Park, Cranbrook

The entrance to the historic Angley Park is said to be haunted by not one but two ghosts!

The first ghost is said to be a witch called Jennings and the second is said to be of a smuggler who died from a gunshot wound.

He was said to have been shot in the village of Sandhurst but manage to walk seven miles to Glassenbury before he eventually died of his wounds.

It’s said that his colleagues then buried his body in some nearby woods!

Local legend says that there are many ghosts of former smugglers in the area as they were often hung in the nearby woods and then buried there.

 

Sissinghurst Castle, Sissinghurst

The village of Sissinghurst is located just to the north east of Cranbrook in the District of Tunbridge Wells.

You’ll find Sissinghurst Castle just off the A262 to the east of the village.

The site which the castle sits on is ancient.

It dates back to the Anglo-Saxon period when the woodland clearing was bought by the Archbishop of Canterbury in 843.

By the Middle Ages a manor house with a three-armed moat was built on the site.

In the 1530s one of Henry VIII’s Privy Councillors Sir John Baker added a new brick gatehouse to the building.

Since the 17th century the castle was used as a prisoner-of-war camp during the Seven Years’ War, a workhouse for the Cranbrook Union and then homes for local farm labourers.

Today it’s run by the National Trust and is famous for its stunning gardens which were created in the 1930s by the poet and gardening writer Vita Sackville-West together with her husband.

If you fancy visit Sissinghurst Castle you’ll be please to discover that it’s now opened to the public.

 

The King’s Head, Five Oak Green

The King’s Head is said to be haunted by an old woman in a black dress who wears a large cameo-style brooch.

Cameo brooches were extremely popular with women in the Victorian era.

Both members of staff and guests alike have seen a dark shadowy figure glide across the saloon bar.

The female residents of the pub would often report jewellery and makeup mysteriously go missing.

The ghostly woman would also be blamed for locking doors, banging noises and causing floorboards to creak in the middle of the night!

She seems to be active from the cellar to the first floor of the pub but is described as being a friendly ghost.

 

Pattyndenne Manor, Goudhurst

Along the Bedgebury Road you’ll come across the timber framed Pattyndenne Manor.

The manor dates back to 1480 when it was first built for the Pattyndenne family.

In the 16th century the house was sold to Sir Maurice Berkeley who was a standard-bearer to Henry VIII, Mary Tudor and Elizabeth I.

Pattyndenne Manor has a reputation for being haunted…

Former owners of the house reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a man wearing clothing from the pre-Elizabethan era.

He’s said to be a friendly ghost and the owners started to refer to him as Thomas!

The owners also noticed that they would often smell a phantom perfume in a room which was once the original banqueting hall.

They said it had a strange spicy smell which reminded them of incense.

 

The Star and Eagle, Goudhurst

Along the High Street you’ll come across a 14th century pub which has a notorious history.

You see in the 18th century the infamous Hawkhead Gang used the Star and Eagle pub as their headquarters.

The smuggling gang used to enter and exit the pub via a secret tunnel.

In 1747 the gang’s illegal activity came to a halt when the local militia killed a couple of them during the Battle of Goudhurst.

Local legend says that the spirits of injured smugglers can still be heard on quiet nights using the now bricked up secret tunnel as an escape route!

 

Groombridge Place, Groombridge

Groombridge Place is said to be haunted by a former ostler of the house.

The ostler was employed to look after the horses of people visiting the manor.

Local legend says that in 1808 an ostler called David Fletcher drowned in the moat.

Terrified witnesses have reported seeing his ghostly apparition standing in the doorway of a cottage which is located near the moat.

Apparently he’s dressed a rusty coloured smock!

Groombridge Place itself is also said to be haunted by the ghostly apparition of a lady dressed in grey.

But nobody really knows the true identity of the ghostly lady.

The phantom smells of old fashioned cigar smoke and lavender perfume have also been reported by visitors near the main staircase of the house!

 

Hawkhurst

Local legend says that ghosts of smugglers roam the country lanes around the village after the sun goes down.

Many of the local pubs once were associated with the notorious Hawkhurst Gang.

They’re now said to be haunted by the spirits of its former members!

Spooked visitors to the 16th century Queen’s Inn along Rye Road have reported seeing a pair of ghostly legs hanging down from the inn’s old inglenook fireplace.

Apparently, the spooky legs belong to the ghost of a former smuggler who hid up the chimney to hide from the local custom men only to die from suffocation.

Keeping to Rye Road…

It’s said that one of the rooms at the Royal Oak Hotel is haunted by a man who died in it.

The ghostly man is said to drift across the room and disappear through the wall.

Members of staff at the Royal Oak have nicknamed him George!

 

Bayham Abbey, Lamberhurst

Situated within the valley of the River Teise to the west of Lamberhurst you’ll find the ruins of Bayham Abbey.

The abbey was founded in 1207 and was run by the Premonstratensian Order until the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII in the 16th century.

The abbey is situated on the Kent and Sussex border.

It’s said that it has an entrance in each county!

The old ruins have a reputation for being haunted by up to twelve ghostly monks.

The ghostly monks are said to be from the Premonstratensian Order as witnesses have described them as wearing white habits.

It’s said that on still moonless nights eerie plainchants and the ringing of bells announce the arrival of a ghostly precession of monks.

They’re seen walking around the areas of the old church and the cloister.

Spooked visitors to the old abbey site have reported smelling the scent of incense and hearing a phantom choir singing somewhere amongst the ruins.

Next to the ruins you’ll find the Grade II* listed Bayham Abbey Dower House which is also said to be haunted.

This time it’s not by phantom monks but by a ghostly couple who’ve been seen gliding across a room and disappearing through a fireplace!

 

Furnace Mill Farm, Lamberhurst

Back in 1906 a story appeared in the Daily Mail newspaper about some poltergeist activity happening in the stable of Furnace Mill Farm, Lamberhurst.

The owners discovered that their horses had been turned around in the middle of the night and one horse had been moved to the nearby hay room.

Heavy lime barrels were pushed down some stairs and large solid water butts had been upturned.

Doors which had been bolted shut the night before were found wide open.

All these disturbances happen under the watchful eyes of the farm’s two guard dogs without provoking any reaction from the otherwise alert animals.

Some people suggest that the mysterious activity was not paranormal at all but in fact a prank played by the owner’s son.

So, I’ll let you make your mind up on whether the farm is haunted or not!

 

Scotney Castle, Lamberhurst

Just to the south-east of Lamberhurst you’ll find the country house of Scotney Castle.

The Tudor Revival style Scotney Castle dates back to 1843 when it was built by Edward Hussey.

Before the Husseys the estate was owned by the Darrell family for over 350 years.

Arthur Darrell was said to have faked his own death after being associated with the murder of a revenue man.

Legend says that he appeared at his own funeral saying to mourners ‘That is me they think they are burying!’

In 1924 his coffin was dug up and opened to reveal it only contained stones.

It’s claimed that he was a smuggler and had actually killed the revenue officer dumping his the body in the castle’s moat!

Shocked visitors to Scotney have reported seeing an apparition of a ghostly man climb out of the moat dripping wet and covered in weed.

He then proceeds down the castle’s pathway to the front door and bangs on it.

Local legend says he’s in search of Arthur Darrell!

The castle itself is said to be haunted by another ghost who’s been blamed for eerie whispering sounds and phantom footsteps walking about the building.

Some say the ghost is the spirit of Walter de Scoteni who was hanged in 1259 for trying to poison the Earl of Gloucester.

 

Ballard’s Lane, Lamberhurst

A local legend which dates back to the 1800s says that Ballard’s Lane is the haunt of a ghostly headless horseman.

Apparently, on dark nights his headless ghost can be seen galloping down a certain stretch of the road on a white steed!

 

The Chequers Inn, Lamberhurst

The Chequers Inn is situated a stone’s throw away from the River Teise in the village.

The pub was originally a manor house in 1137 but was converted to an inn in 1414!

The Chequers is said to be haunted by a ghostly woman in red who can only be seen by female members of staff.

She’s been caught peering out of windows by staff members before disappearing into thin air.

She’s believed to be the cause of phantom footsteps which ascended the stairs.

And is also blamed for furniture being mysteriously moved about!

A former barmaid reported that she saw a ghostly apparition of a woman with long dark hair wearing a black top who peer around the dividing doors of the bar after closing time one night.

Room 4 at the inn is believed to be haunted by another ghost…

Guests often complain about the sudden temperature drops in the room as well as the strange tapping noises.

One guest reported that an invisible entity tried to climb into his bed with him in the middle of the night!

 

The Vineyard, Lamberhurst

The Vineyard pub dates back to the 17th century but back in 2009 the landlord reported to the local press that his pub was plagued by poltergeist activity.

Doors slamming on their own accord, glasses being mysteriously smashed, eerie noises and strange anomalies caught on the building’s CCTV system were just some of the paranormal events he reported to have happened at the pub.

Many believe the pub is haunted by a former landlord from the 1800s called George who it seems is still looking after his inn today!

 

Lindridge Place, Lamberhurst Quarter

You’ll find the Grade II listed mid-16th century Lindridge Place at Lamberhurst Quarter.

In the mid 1980s it came to light that the house was haunted by a ghostly woman.

The gardener spotted her leaning against the chimney breast of the inglenook fireplace.

Apparently, once she was spotted she just faded away into thin air!

Some believe that the ghostly lady is the spirit of a woman called Miss Japp who died in the house just before the Second World War.

 

The Tunbridge Wells Hotel, Pantiles

The Tunbridge Wells Hotel situated in the Pantiles was once known as the Swan Hotel.

In its time the Swan Hotel had a reputation for being haunted.

Before it was transformed into a hotel it was called High House.

It was during this period that legend says a young broken hearted woman leaped to her death from a window after being refused to see her lover.

Room 16 at the hotel is said to be haunted.

Spooked guests and members of staff alike have reported hearing an eerie tapping noise at the window.

An unseen entity has also been blamed for mysteriously moving bedroom furniture and for throwing the bed sheets around the room!

Back in 1997 a ghostly woman in grey was seen by terrified witnesses wandering the hotel.

 

The Ragged Trousers, Pantiles

The Ragged Trousers pub is said to be haunted by the ghost of a carpenter wearing an apron.

His ghostly apparition has been seen by terrified witnesses gliding across rooms and disappearing through walls.

Phantom footsteps and objects moving on their own accord have also been reported to take place within the building.

 

The Coach and Horses Passage, Pantiles

Some witnesses say they hear the sound of a creaking rope under strain when they pass through the Coach and Horses Passage.

The eerie noise is said to be from the ghost of a local 19th century man who was in severe debt and hanged himself in the passage.

 

The Corn Exchange, Pantiles

The Corn Exchange building dates back to 1801 and is said to be haunted by the ghostly apparition of a Victorian lady.

 

Major York’s Road, Pantiles

On the grass along Major York’s Road just by the mini-roundabout at the back of the Pantiles you’ll find a weathered milestone.

Shocked witnesses have reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a nineteen year old woman dressed in Georgian period clothing standing by the stone.

She appears to be waiting for somebody or something!

 

The Beacon, Royal Tunbridge Wells

You’ll find the Beacon country pub situated along Tea Garden Lane which is just off the Langton Road on the west side of Royal Tunbridge Wells.

The late 19th century building has a reputation for being haunted…

During the 1980s and 1990s terrified witnesses reported seeing bottles and glasses flying across the bar area on their own accord.

Phantoms footsteps and the sighting of a male shadowy figure on the stairs were also seen by a member of staff.

He described the apparition as wearing an outfit which looked like a policeman or a prison officer’s uniform!

Over his employment at the Beacon the same witness also saw the ghostly apparition of a woman in a white cloak.

Apparently, she would walk from a small door towards the fireplace where she would disappear into thin air.

 

The Compasses, Royal Tunbridge Wells

You’ll find the Compasses pub along Little Mount Sion in Royal Tunbridge Wells.

The 17th century pub is said to be one of the oldest in the town as well as one of the most haunted!

Local legend says that the ghosts a murdered young girl and her killer haunt the pub.

Members of staff and guests alike have reported seeing shadowy figures walking around the building.

On one occasion, a spooked staff member saw the ghostly apparition of a dark-haired woman in an old fashioned white smock walk past one of the pub’s doors.

The Compasses is also said to be home to a menacing male spirit!

 

The Grove Tavern, Royal Tunbridge Wells

Where Berkeley Road and Little Mount Sion meet in Royal Tunbridge Wells you’ll find the Grove Tavern pub.

This great little pub is said to be one of the oldest in the town.

It’s also has a reputation for being haunted!

Although no sightings have been reported recently, local legend says that the pub was haunted by a male spirit called Joshua.

His ghostly apparition was often seen by spooked witnesses walking along the old passageway next to the pub.

It’s said that the passageway at one time lead to a house of ill-repute!

 

The Opera House, Royal Tunbridge Wells

You’ll find Royal Tunbridge Wells’ Grade II listed Opera House along Mount Pleasant Road in the town.

It’s a great looking building which was design by the architect John Briggs in 1902 in an Edwardian Baroque style.

Over the decades the Opera House has been used for different types of entertainment.

It was originally an 1100 seater used for concerts but in 1931 it was bought by Union Cinemas and turned into a cinema.

In the 1960s it changed use again and was transferred into a bingo hall.

And in the mid 1990s it was bought by J D Wetherspoon who now used it as a pub.

The Opera House has a reputation for being haunted…

But you may be surprised to discover that it’s not haunted by the ghosts of past opera goers but in fact by the ghosts of the men who built it.

You see, three builders tragically died in the construction of the Opera House when they fell from scaffolding whilst they worked on the ceiling.

And it’s now said that the ghosts of two of these poor men haunt the theatre boxes within the building!

 

Tunbridge Wells Assembly Hall Theatre, Royal Tunbridge Wells

You’ll find the Tunbridge Wells Assembly Hall Theatre along Crescent Road in the town.

It’s a solid looking brick building which was built by the Tunbridge Wells Corporation and designed by Percy Thomas and Ernest Prestwich.

The Assembly Hall Theatre opened its doors to the paying public in 1939.

Today the theatre holds 1020 people and hosts a variety of popular entertainment events.

The Assembly Hall Theatre is said to be haunted by a couple of ghosts…

Terrified members of staff have reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a lady dressed in white gliding across the circle.

Those who witness her ghostly apparition also report smelling a terrible odour which accompanies her!

The ghost of a man who tragically died in the 1960s after falling into a vat of oil in the Assembly Hall’s basement is also said to haunt the building.
His spirit has been blamed for doors slamming shut on their own accord, lights mysteriously switching themselves on and off and sudden temperature drops.

 

Broomhill Road, Southborough

You’ll find Broomhill Road to the south west of Southborough just off Speldhurst Road.

The road has two ghostly tales to tell…

The first is of a phantom headless horseman who’s been witnessed galloping along a wooded pathway close to Broomhill Road.

Legend says that he’s the ghost of a Parliamentarian horseman who was beheaded in battle during the English Civil War.

The second ghost seen by shocked motorists driving along Broomhill Road is of a man dressed in grey who suddenly appears on the side of the road.

Many drivers have to swerve to avoid hitting him!

Some who’d believed they’ve knocked him over stop only to find that he has disappeared into thin air.

Many believe that the ghostly apparition is of a man who once lived in a cottage that was located along the Broomhill Road.

 

The Friars, Aylesford

Just off the High Street in the village you’ll find The Friars which is the priory in Aylesford.

The priory was founded in 1242 by monks of the Order of Carmelites who came from the Holy Land.

They settled on land belonging Richard de Grey under his patronage

Today the priory is a popular place for pilgrims as well as a peaceful retreat.

The priory has a reputation for being haunted by ghostly monks…

There’s an area called Monk’s Walk which is said to be haunted by the ghost of a monk who was bricked up alive behind a wall in the priory by his fellow friars.

Terrified witnesses have described seeing his downcast apparition wandering Monk’s Walk dressed in a white gown.

Apparently, two ghostly friars jump him from behind some trees and drag him off towards the priory where then all three apparitions disappear into thin air!

 

Preston Hall, Aylesford

Just off the London Road in Aylesford you’ll find a grand looking Grade II listed Victorian building called Preston Hall.

The present Jacobean style hall dates back to 1848 when the original house was bought by Edward Ladd Betts who demolished it and built a new hall.

The previous manorial home dated back to 1102 and was owned by the Culpepper family from 1300 to 1734.

During the First World War the hall was used as a hospital and convalescent home for wounded soldiers.

After the war the estate became known as the Preston Hall Colony and became a sanatorium, training colony and village settlement.

In 1925 the British legion took over the running of the Colony.

Preston Hall later was passed to the local health board.

And in 2014 the hall was sold by the Department of Health to Weston Homes who converted it into luxury apartments.

There’s a local legend associated with the hall that back in the Elizabethan period a lady of the house was having a secret affair.

One night her lover crept into the hall but bumped into one of the maids.

Although it was a brief innocent encounter, the Elizabethan lady flew into a jealous rage and murdered her lover.

Witnesses have reported seeing a ghostly female apparition dressed in an Elizabethan flowing dress in one of the hall’s rooms.

The phantom sounds of a young couple arguing have also been heard in the hall!

 

The Bower Inn, Maidstone

On the corner of Warwick Place and Tonbridge Road in Maidstone you’ll find the Bower Inn.

The building dates back to 1801 and sits on an ancient piece of land which was once known as the Bower.

Hence the pub’s name!

The Bower Inn is said to have a residential ghost called Sidney…

His ghostly apparition has been seen standing in the corner of the pub.

It’s said that members of staff don’t like going to the pub’s cellar alone because of its atmosphere.

Sometimes the beer taps have been known to mysteriously turn themselves off!

 

The Dog and Gun, Maidstone

The Dog and Gun pub is located in the north of the town along the Boxley Road.

The friendly community pub has a reputation in the local area for being haunted…

The stairs which go up to the attic room are said to be the haunt of a ghostly old lady.

On different occasions both a former landlady and her son reported that they felt they’d been pushed down the stairs by something unseen.

Maybe the ghostly old lady took a dislike to them!

Nobody really knows who the spooky old lady is but some believe she might be the ghost of a former resident.

 

The Fisherman’s Arms, Maidstone

Along Lower Stone Street you’ll find an old pub called the Fisherman’s Arms.

The building dates back to the 1430s and is said to be one of the oldest in the town.

With such an old building you probably won’t be too surprised to discover that it’s rumoured to have a residential ghost…

The ghost which is said to haunt the Fisherman’s Arms is called Black Jack.

Black Jack is believed to be the spirit of a parliamentarian soldier from the English Civil War era.

Legend says he was shot during a skirmish and stumbled into the building where he died.

A former landlady of the pub once saw a ghostly black apparition of a man in the pub.

And this is when Black Jack got his nickname!

 

The Queen Anne, Maidstone

Along Queen Anne Road in the town you’ll find the Queen Anne pub.

The pub is said to be haunted by the spirit of a woman.

Local legend says that many years ago a woman was run over by a cart on the road outside the Queen Anne pub.

She tragically died from the injuries she received in the accident!

Her ghost has been blamed for making glasses mysteriously fall of shelves.

Over the years spooked witnesses have reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a woman walk through the front doors of the pub and vanish into thin air!

 

The White Rabbit, Maidstone

Along Sandling Road you’ll come across the White Rabbit pub and restaurant.

The building dates back to 1797 when it was first built as the officers’ quarters for the Invicta Barracks.

The White Rabbit is said to be haunted by the ghost of a little girl…

Witnesses have described her as wearing a Victorian style white frock.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen in Room 8 and walking along the pub’s corridors.

Some witnesses reported hearing her calling out for her pet cat!

The door of Room 8 has been seen to open and close on its own accord.

And the pub’s menu chalkboards have been mysteriously moved around.

On some occasions the pub’s lights have been known to switch themselves on and off!

 

Allington Castle, Maidstone

Local legend says that a maid at the castle was hung for drowning her illegitimate baby in the castle’s moat.

Although paranormal activity hasn’t been reported recently, it’s still believed that the ghost of the maid haunts the castle.

Her phantom footsteps have been heard walking around the castle.

And in the past, terrified witnesses have seen her ghostly apparition near the Soloman’s Tower and in the garden of the King’s Tower.

 

The Bull Inn, Barming

You’ll find the Bull Inn along the Tonbridge Road in Barming.

The present day Grade II listed building dates back to the 18th century.

The pub sits on a crossroads which are generally notorious for spooky stuff such as once being places for executions and the burial of witches!

I don’t know whether such activities happened in the past at the crossroads near the Bull Inn but instances of paranormal activity have been reported to take place at the pub in bygone years…

Phantom footsteps and eerie whispering have been heard by witnesses at the pub as well as seeing beer glasses moving on their own accord.

On some occasions, beer glasses were actaully seen to be mysteriously flung across the bar room!

Now, if you fancy visiting Barming be careful of its wooded areas…

Local legend says that a phantom horseman likes to rush at cars in those areas!

 

The Cobham Manor Riding Centre, Maidstone

You’ll find the Cobham Manor Riding Centre to the east of Kent’s county town of Maidstone.

It’s situated along Water Lane which is only a stone’s throw away from the ancient trackway called the Pilgrims Way.

In 1985 a mother and her daughter were doing circuits on horseback around the paddock whilst dad was videoing them.

The next day the wife started to watch the previous day’s video on her telly at home when she got the shock of her life…

You see, on the video was a ghostly figure in the undergrowth by the fence of the paddock watching them riding.

The apparition had white hair and was dressed in a white cravat and dark period clothing.

In fact, he looked like a Quaker preacher or a Pilgrim Father from the 17th century.

Which is eerie… seeing how close the riding centre is to the Pilgrims Way!

You can watch the video on YouTube here… https://youtu.be/U7j8pP43ZJM

 

The White Horse, Bearsted

The White Horse pub situated on the Green in the village has a legend associated with it.

It’s said that the ghost of a Victorian jester called Stiches the Clown haunts the pub!

Apparently he died laughing after being shown the secret to the perfect comical fall by an ancient clown guru.

And now his ghost returns to the pub in hope of passing on his secret to the next generation of clowns.

 

The Oak, Bearsted

Keeping to the Green, you’ll find another pub called the Oak.

The pub dates back to 1665 and it’s said that its kitchen was once a holding goal for the local courtroom.

The Oak is rumoured to be haunted but not by the spirits of former prisoners waiting their fate at the local courtroom but by the ghost of a little girl.

She’s been blamed for constantly opening the window in one of the pub’s lesser used rooms!

 

Blue Bell Hill, Maidstone

Many motorists driving along the A229 have reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a young woman hitching a lift on the hill.

Apparently she is very lifelike…

Some motorists offer her a lift and are shocked when she later disappears into thin air after climbing into their cars.

And on some occasions she has suddenly ran out in front of their cars resulting in her being run over!

Convince that they’ve been involved in a serious accident many of the motorists ring the police only to be stumped when they can’t find any evidence of her when the police arrive.

Some people believe that she’s the spirit of a twenty year old murder victim from 1916 called Emily Trigg.

Whilst others believe she’s the ghost of a bride-to-be who was killed in a tragic car accident on the hill in 1965.

The ghostly legend of the Blue Bell Hill get a little bit more complicated because other motorist have also reported seeing a ghostly woman on the side of the road but this time she’s a vile looking old hag!

Maybe the hill is haunted by two ghostly women?

Some believe the old hag ghost is the spirit of a local reclusive woman who once lived in the area and was often seen roaming the nearby woods at night.

 

The Old Rectory, Boughton Malherbe

The Old Rectory is said to be one of the most haunted buildings in the area.

The Grey Monk hauntings are said to date back to the 1600’s.

His ghostly apparition has been seen by terrified witnesses in the upper rooms of the rectory.

The monk has been described as being a five foot tall hunch-backed who wears a grey cowl.

His ghostly form was last witnessed in the 1930’s.

The upstairs passageway and rooms off it were said to be his favourite haunts.

The rectory was also rumoured to be haunted by the ghost of a kindly woman.

Her apparition is described as wearing a fine grey silk dress and carrying a bunch of flowers.

During the Second World War two teenage girls stayed the night at the rectory.

In the morning they were on their way down to get breakfast when they saw a bedroom door off the passageway was left opened.

They peeked into the room and were surprised to see a young girl in her nightdress sitting on the bed plaiting her hair.

When the girls sat down to breakfast they asked about the young girl in the bedroom.

They were told that they were the only girls in the rectory at the time as the vicar’s daughter was away!

 

Boxley House, Boxley

Just off the Street in Boxley you’ll find a stunning 17th Century Jacobean Manor called Boxley House.

Since the 1950s the house has got a reputation for being haunted by the ghost of a former butler called Thomas Sales.

Legend says he committed suicide at the house in 1898 after being blackmailed by burglars who ransacked and stole items from the house.

During building work his ghostly apparition was witnessed by the owner of Boxley House.

She described him as being a small man dressed in a butler’s coat with black brushed back hair.

Guests of the house have also witnessed the ghostly butler typically heading towards the stairs or lounge room.

On a couple of occasions witnesses have reported being pushed in the back by unseen hands whilst they were coming down the stairs!

 

Toastmaster’s Inn, Burnham

Along Church Street in the Kent village of Burnham you’ll find the Toastmaster’s Inn.

The inn dates back to 1812 when it was originally known as the Royal Exchange.

The pub has a reputation for being haunted…

Glasses have been known to move on their own accord and a ghostly figure has been seen in the bar area.

At one time there was a cottage next to the pub which was owned by one of the Toastmaster’s regulars called Mabel.

Mabel was a common sight at the pub, so much so that they named her favourite spot ‘Mabel’s Corner’.

When Mabel sadly died, the landlords of the pub bought her cottage next door and extended the pub into it making a new snug bar and a second kitchen.

It seems that Mabel love the pub so much that she never left it!

You see, during an event at the pub on New Year’s Eve 2001 an innocent photo was taken of revellers enjoying themselves…

But, if you look closely at the photo you’ll see that a picture which should be of an old pub now has the beaming face of Mabel in it!

 

The Walnut Tree, East Farleigh

You’ll find the Walnut Tree pub along Forge Lane in the Kent village of East Farleigh.

It’s a traditional country pub which has been serving ale since 1796.

The building is made up of three cottages which actually date back to 1528!

The Walnut Tree has a reputation for being haunted by the ghosts of hop-pickers who tragically died of cholera in the village back in 1849.

Pint glasses have been seen to move and even fall onto the pub’s floor on their own accord.

Decorative jugs hanging from the pubs beams have been seen to suddenly swing wildly.

Bar stools have been moved on their own accord and pans are mysteriously stacked in the kitchen!

On one occasion, the pub’s customers were stunned to see a ghostly face appear in the blackboard.

Witnesses have also reported to hear phantom footsteps walking around the upstairs of the pub.

And ghostly figures have even been seen to walk through the pub’s walls!

 

The Kings Head, Grafty Green

Grafty Green is a small hamlet to the south east of the Kent county town of Maidstone.

If you head along Headcorn Road in the hamlet you’ll come across a historic 16th century coaching inn called the Kings Head.

The Kings Head has a couple of ghostly tales to tell…

The pub is said to be haunted by the ghost of a smuggler called Dover Bill.

It’s said that Dover Bill and his gang used the pub to socialise and do a bit of business.

That’s until one day when the revenue men came a knocking.

They arrested members of Bill’s gang but Bill got away scot free.

Some say that he informed on his fellow smugglers to save himself.

But whatever happened, the outcome for his partners in crime was bad.

They were hung for their smuggling crimes in front of a large crowd on Penenden Heath.

It’s said that Dover Bill was actually in the crowd and watched his fellow smugglers being hanged.

After the hanging it’s said he was ostracised by the local community and eventually died in poverty.

It’s now said that his ghost haunts the Kings Head.

Witnesses have reported seeing his ghostly apparition lurking outside the pub!

Another apparition seen outside the pub is that of a phantom coach and horses…

Legend says that a speeding coach and horses overturned near to the pub in a horrific accident.

All the passengers and the driver were instantly killed.

Their bodies were said to have been taken to the nearby Kings Head.

The driver was said to have been beheaded in the accident!

And it’s now said that on misty nights a phantom coach and horses being driven by a headless coachman can be seen travelling dangerously fast along the road outside the pub.

 

The Ringlestone Inn, Ringlestone

You’ll find the hamlet of Ringlestone between the Kent villages of Wormshill and Harrietsham.

Along the Ringlestone Road in the hamlet is an old Grade II listed pub called the Ringlestone Inn.

In the 1960’s the inn was famous for its mother and daughter landladies who would regularly fire a shotgun in the ceiling to send rowdy customers packing!

The Ringlestone Inn dates back to 1533 and has a reputation for being haunted…

Guests and members of staff alike have reported seeing the ghostly apparitions of an elderly couple having a drink next to the pub’s inglenook fireplace.

The ghostly couple are described as happy, likable and extremely lifelike!

Witnesses at the pub have reported hearing phantom footsteps climbing the cellar steps.

Apparently the phantom footsteps stop at the top of the cellar stairs were one boot is heard to be taken off and thrown to the floor.

One day, a former owner of the pub reported seeing an apparition of a young boy walk straight through one of the pub’s walls.

It was later discovered that a door had once existed at that point in the pub’s wall.

Apparently, a young boy who had once lived at the pub but sadly died in the upstairs part of the inn.

The ghost of this young boy has been blamed for moving keys and toys around.

There’s also a legend associated with the pub about another small boy, believed to be a former landlord’s son, who was caught poaching in the farmland around the pub.

To protect their son from a harsh punishment, the family hid him in a small cavity in an old fireplace in the pub’s cellar and then bricked the area up leaving only a small hole in a wall to feed him food through.

One day the boy stopped taking food in and the family believed that he had died.

The father eventually bricked the hole in the wall up and the family left the pub for good!

It’s now believed that one of the ghostly children who are said to haunt the building is the ghost of this poor unfortunate boy.

Some people say that the Black Post Crossroads near to the Ringlestone Inn is haunted by the ghost of a local highwayman called Elias Shephered who was hung for his crimes on Penenden Heath in 1765.

 

Eyhorne Manor, Hollingbourne

Eyhorne Manor is a privately owned Grade II listed Wealden house in the Kent village of Hollingbourne.

The building dates back to the 15th century which over the years has undergone many changes.

In the 1940s the manor house was made up of three cottages.

During this time, one of the cottages had a reputation for being haunted by the ghost of a little old grey haired lady.

The four year old daughter of the owner would often ask her mother who was the little old lady who would read to her at night!

The mother would often hear phantom footsteps walking around the cottage.

And on a few occasions she would hear her daughter chatting away to somebody in her bedroom even though she was alone at the time.

One of her neighbours reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a grey lady gliding through the hallway.

And one day whilst the owner was gardening she got the shock of her life when she glanced up and saw the apparition of a man in black who then proceeded to disappeared into thin air!

The apparition of a man in a green velvet suit has also been seen by witnesses at the property.

The sound of phantom footsteps, coins clinking together and objects mysteriously going missing were all regular occurrences at the cottage.

Even the ghost of a little dog was seen to walk straight through a closed door!

 

The Sugar Loaves, Hollingbourne

You’ll find the Sugar Loaves pub along Eyhorne Street in the Kent village of Hollingbourne.

The building is said to date back to the 1600’s.

And it’s been run as a pub since the 1800’s.

Previous owners of the pub believed it was haunted by the ghost of a former landlord who ran the Sugar Loaves forty years before them.

A ghostly male apparition was often seen behind the bar by spooked members of staff and customers alike.

One regular actually reported being poked in the ribs by something unseen whilst he was drinking in the pub!

 

Hollingbourne Manor House, Hollingbourne

At the foot of Hollingbourne Hill you’ll discover a Grade I listed Elizabethan manor house called Hollingbourne Manor House.

The manor is a former home of the Culpeper family.

Catherine Howard was the granddaughter of Sir Richard Culpeper of Hollingbourne.

Her ghost is said to haunt the manor house.

Another ghost who’s said to haunt the house is that of a small man.

A phantom horseman has been witnesses trotting through the village before disappearing through the gates of Hollingbourne Manor House.

The apparition of the horseman is described as being very lifelike.

He’s said to be wearing a wide-brimmed hat and is accompanied by the eerie sound of spurs jangling in the still night air!

The ghostly horseman is said to be the ghost of a gentleman called Baldwin Duppa.

He once lived at the manor house in the 17th century.

 

All Saints Church, Hollingbourne

The ghost of Lady Grace Gethin is said to haunt the churchyard of the Grade I listed All Saints Church in the centre of the village.

Her apparition has been described as wearing an immaculate dress with a bonnet.

 

The Windmil, Hollingbourne

The Windmill pub in Eyhorne Street is rumoured to be haunted by the ghost of a former landlord.

 

Leeds Castle, Maidstone

The main haunting at Leeds Castle isn’t by a ghost of one of its historical residents but in fact by a large black dog.

This ghostly hellhound is said to have been haunting the castle since the 15th century!

It’s said not to only haunt the castle but also the local lanes in the countryside around it.

Legend says that if you look into the eyes of the phantom dog something terrible will happen to you.

Residents of Leeds Castle have reported in the past of seeing a ghostly black dog which was seen to vanish through walls…

But this ghostly dog was described as a black Labrador and not the legendary hellhound!

The apparitions of two more dogs have been seen by witnesses more recently at the castle.

They’re described as a small white dog and a much larger dark dog.

Many believe these ghostly dogs were the pets of Lady Baillie who owned a little white terrier called Smudge and a Great Dane called Boots!

In 1450 the Duchess of Gloucester was imprisoned at the castle for practising witchcraft.

She was even given the nickname of the Wicked Duchess!

In the distant past, terrified witnesses have reported seeing a ghostly woman gliding along the corridors of the castle…

Apparently this ghostly woman resembled none other than the Wicked Duchess herself!

Another female phantom seen at the castle is of a woman in a long flowing dress who’s brushing her hair.

Her ghost is often seen in the grounds of the castle and in the Queen’s Room.

Nobody knows exactly who this ghostly lady is but some have put forward the theory that she was the wife of the old Lord Fairfax!

 

The Red Lion, Lenham

In the Square in the centre of the Kent village of Lenham you’ll find the Red Lion pub.

The Red Lion dates back to the 14th century.

In the days before the railway came to the village it was a busy coaching inn.

And like a lot of old coaching inns up and down the country it has a ghostly tale attached to it.

It’s said to be haunted by the ghost of an old man who once stayed there on his pilgrimage to Canterbury!

 

The Bull Inn, Linton

You’ll find the historic Bull Inn on Linton Hill in the village.

The pub is very old, in fact it dates back to 1674.

At one time the building was split up into three separate businesses…

A post office, a barbers and a pub!

Today, the areas which were once the post office and barbers have now been incorporated into the pub and are now its restaurant.

As with a lot of Britain’s historic pubs the Bull Inn is rumoured to be haunted.

It’s said to be haunted by the ghost of a woman who’s wearing a black dress with her hair tied up in a bun.

Spooked customers have reported to have heard their names called out by something unseen.

And the apparition of a pet cat has also been seen wandering around the place!

 

Town Hall, Maidstone

Maidstone Georgian Town Hall is located on the High Street in the town.

The impressive building dates back to 1763 when it was first used as Magistrate’s Courts.

Above the Council Chambers in the building you’ll find an old prison cell which still has graffiti carved in it from former prisoners awaiting deportation.

With its history as Magistrate’s Courts, you probably won’t be too surprised to discover that the old Town Hall is rumoured to be haunted by the ghost of a former judge.

He’s ghost has been blamed for the phantom footsteps which are sometimes heard climbing the stairs!

 

Kent Life, Sandling

Kent Life is an open-air rural life museum located to the north of Maidstone in the suburb of Sandling.

It used to be known as the Museum of Kent Life when it first opened in 1985.

The museum is made up from the restored Sandling Farm which was once part of the Cobtree Manor Estate.

It covers over 20 acres of land and consists of over a dozen old rural buildings.

A lot of these buildings are rumoured to be haunted…

The Oast House and the pond is said to be haunted by the ghost of a young woman.

It’s also said to be haunted by a ghost nicknamed Peg Leg Jack who lost his leg in a dispute with a local farmer.

And the 18th century five bay barn is said to have a curse on it!

Members of staff and guests alike have reported witnessing shadowy ghostly figures, hearing strange eerie noises and seeing a mysterious candle light flickering away in one of the old building’s windows at night.

In 1912 a farmer’s young wife was tragically killed in an accident with a cart.

Legend says that her ghostly spirit wanders around the site looking for her new-born child who actually survived the accident!

 

The Royal Star Arcade, Maidstone

You’ll find the Royal Star Arcade along the High Street in the centre of Maidstone.

The indoor mini-shopping centre stands on the site of the old Royal Star Hotel and still retains many of its period features.

The original Star Hotel dated back to the 16th century when it started life out as a busy coaching inn.

The hotel got its royal seal of approval in the 19th century when a young Queen Victoria visited it.

The Royal Star Arcade has a reputation for being haunted…

In the 1970s witnesses reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a caretaker.

Apparently he was wearing a flat cap and overalls!

 

Vinters Valley Nature Reserve, Maidstone

You’ll find Vinters Valley Nature Reserve tuck away between Vinters Park and the Grove Green housing estates to the north east of Maidstone.

The nature reserve which was once part of a large 18th century country estate is over 90 acres in size.

It comprises of woodland, grassland, marshland and a lake.

In 2003 a visitor was walking through a wooded area of the reserve when he sudden saw a ghostly apparition of a man dressed in Victorian clothing walk across the pathway in front of him and disappear straight through a fence.

He described the ghostly man as having long blonde tied back hair and was walking in a puppet-like way.

What really freaked the witnesses out was the grisly appearance of the figure.

He had no face or legs and where his chest should’ve been was a big black hole!

 

Nettlestead

You’ll find the small Kent village of Nettlestead located on the banks of the River Medway to the south west of the county town of Maidstone.

The village has a rather disturbing ghost story associated with it…

There’s a footpath which leads from the parish church of St Mary the Virgin towards the nearby River Medway.

Local legend says that around the 11th November every year a ghostly apparition of an old bridge appears at the end of this footpath spanning the river.

On the bridge an eerie re-enactment of a ghostly monk throwing a bound and gagged woman into the river appears.

As the woman hits the water the ghostly scene disappears into thin air!

 

Barham Court, Teston

You’ll find the stunning Barham Court in the Kent village of Teston.

It was once the home to Reginald Fitz Urse.

He was one of the knights who murdered Thomas Beckett at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170.

Today the house is used as offices, apartments and for social events.

Barham Court is said to be haunted by the ghost of John Miles who tragically died in a fire at the house in 1852.

Phantom children voices, sudden temperature drops and eerie footsteps running up the stairs have all been reported by spooked witnesses at the house.

The most active parts of the building are said to be the corridors and the public accessible areas.

 

Thurnham Castle, Thurnham

You’ll find the ruins of Thurnham Castle to the north of the Kent village of Thurnham which is about three miles north east of Maidstone.

The flint-built castle was built by Robert de Thurnham in the reign of Henry II in the 12th century.

It’s said that Robert de Thurnham never returned from the crusades and the castle was left to fall into a ruinous state.

In 2003, a group of people at the castle witnessed the ghostly apparition of a very tall man dressed in a blue and green tunic.

Apparently he ran past the group waving his hands wildly in the air before disappearing.

The shocked witnesses described him as have short hair and no face!

 

The Ship Inn, Rochester

You’ll find the Ship Inn along Rochester’s High Street.

The building is old, it dates back to 1832!

The Ship Inn is said to be one of the oldest gay pubs in the country.

It also has a reputation for having a copy of ghosts…

The first is believed to be the spirit of a former barman who tragically committed suicide forty years ago after breaking up with his boyfriend.

He hung himself in the small panelled room at the back of the pub.

Members of staff often report on feeling that there’s a presence in the room.

They’ve also notice objects in the room to mysteriously go missing then reappear some time later!

Phantom footsteps have also been heard by spooked members of staff walking around a disused upstairs room of the pub.

About a century ago, a woman who’s thought to have been a prostitute died in that room.

It’s believed that it’s her ghost which is responsible for the phantom footsteps.

 

The Nags Head, Rochester

The four hundred year old Nags Head pub is located along Rochester’s High Street.

Many moons ago the site was a stables and police cells…

It’s said that a prostitute named Aggie hanged herself in one of the police cells.

And that she now haunts the Nags Head!

Spooked witnesses have reported seeing her ghostly apparition on the pub’s stairs and in the old cellar.

A former landlady reported that she often heard the eerie sound of the voice of a young woman crying out in the middle of the night.

Another landlord reported that he’d seen Aggie’s ghost and had also heard weird clicking and banging noises in the dead of night!

 

Rochester Railway Station, Rochester

Just off Rochester’s High Street you’ll find the town’s railway station.

The station dates back to 1892 and has a ghost story associated with it…

Over a hundred years ago a man travelling on a train shot himself in his carriage as the train arrived at Rochester Station.

He was found by the guard and taken to St Bartholomew’s Hospital where he sadly died from his wounds.

A couple of months after the tragic event two porters at the station witnessed the ghostly apparition of man clutching at his neck with a painful expression on his face.

As they approached the ghostly man he disappeared into thin air!

 

Medway Little Theatre, Rochester

You’ll find the Medway Little Theatre along Rochester’s High Street.

The hundred seater theatre was converted from an old disused warehouse in 1953 by amateur dramatists.

The Medway Little Theatre is said to be haunted…

It’s believed that the spirit maybe from the time when the building was used as a warehouse.

Witnesses have reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a figure dressed in a large wide-brimmed hat and wearing a long coat wandering around the theatre.

Some theatre goers have even reported feeling a ghostly presence near them whilst they’re watching a performance!

 

Royal Function Rooms, Rochester

On Star Hill in Rochester you’ll come across a building called the Royal Function Rooms.

Today the building is used by a family run business who rent out its rooms for social occasions.

The building dates back to 1791 when it was first called the Theatre Royal.

Later, in the 1850s it changed its name to the Lyceum.

Like a lot of old theatres up and down the county the Royal Function Rooms has a reputation for being haunted…

It’s said to be haunted by up to three ghosts.

One of the ghosts is said to be an aggressive male who witnesses have described as wearing a blue silk waistcoat with a white shirt.

He’s ghostly apparition is often seen on the stage.

Apparently he has a thing about the stage curtains being left drawn.

Witnesses reported that he would angrily run around the stage, knocking over chairs and thumping the curtains!

The old auditorium is said to be haunted by another angry male ghost who witnesses have reported to hear shouting.

The final ghost at the Royal Function Rooms is said to be of a woman spirit.

She’s been known to knock on doors and rattle their handles.

She’s been witnessed in the basement of the building and is described as wearing a long period dress and bonnet!

 

The Queen Charlotte, Rochester

Along Rochester’s High Street you’ll find a modern looking pub called the Queen Charlotte.

The pub has a reputation for being haunted by not one but two ghosts…

During the Second World War the landlord of the pub was arrested for being a German spy.

Apparently he would send information to the Germans via a transmitter he had hidden in the pub’s attic.

It’s said that the strange shuffling noises which are heard coming from the pub’s attic are made by his ghost still trying to send messages to the Germans!

The bar area and the cellar of the Queen Charlotte are said to be haunted by the ghost of an old lady with grey hair.

Members of staff have reported suddenly smelling the scent of lavender whilst working in the pub.

They believe that the scent shows that the old lady’s spirit is nearby.

Her ghost has also been blamed for glasses being mysteriously smashed!

 

The Six Poor Travellers House, Rochester

Along Rochester’s High Street you’ll come across a 16th century Tudor charity house called the Six Poor Travellers House.

It was founded by the Elizabethan MP Richard Watts to provide board and lodgings for six poor travellers.

The house continued to give shelter for the poor right up until the 1940s.

The Six Poor Travellers House was the inspiration for Charles Dickens’ Christmas short story The Seven Poor Travellers.

In 1979 the house was restored and is now open to the public to have a look around.

The building has a reputation for being haunted…

Terrified witnesses have reported hearing eerie cries and moans coming from the small bedrooms at the back of the property.

Other strange knocking noises have also been heard throughout the building.

A ghostly grey figure has been witnessed in the courtyard.

And an apparition of a Victorian soldier has been seen in one of the bedrooms by spooked visitors!

 

The Guildhall, Rochester

You’ll find the historic Guildhall along Rochester’s High Street.

The Grade I listed building dates back to 1697.

And it has been part of the Guildhall Museum since 1979.

The Guildhall is known locally for its magnificent plaster ceiling and gilded copper warship weathervane.

The plaster ceiling was donated to the Guildhall by Sir Cloudsley Shovell in 1695.

He was the Member of Parliament for Rochester at the time.

And it’s the ghost of Sir Cloudsley Shovell which is believed to haunt the Guildhall today…

A couple of members of staff have reported to have been touched on their shoulder by something unseen at the very top of the main stairway just near to the portrait of Sir Cloudsley Shovell.

A terrified member of staff once witnessed a ghostly apparition of a man walk straight through a door.

He headed towards her but disappeared into thin air before he reached her.

Apparently he was wearing a white powdered wig!

Another ghostly man has been seen on the Guildhall’s private staircase.

He’s been described as wearing a black frockcoat.

The Victorian museum next door to the Guildhall is also said to be haunted by a ghostly man.

He’s been seen next to the main door and is believed to be the spirit of a man who sadly committed suicide in the building after having financial problems.

 

The George Vaults, Rochester

Along Rochester’s High Street you’ll come across a bar and brassiere called the George Vaults.

The late 18th century Grade II listed building has an amazing vaulted 14th-century cellar which is rumoured to be haunted…

Spooked members of staff have reported hearing the eerie sound of a young girl humming away.

On many occasions both members of staff and guests alike have reported seeing a very life like apparition of a monk in dark habit!

Another ghostly apparition seen in the vaults is of an old friendly man.

Apparently, he tends to suddenly appear in front of a witness then smiles at then and quickly disappears into thin air again.

Terrified staff members in the main bar area have also reported bottles and glasses flying off shelfs on their own accord!

And witnesses have also reported seeing apparitions of figures hanging from the ceiling above the stairs which lead to the Lounge Bar.

It’s said that a ghost hunting group once investigated the George Vaults…

Apparently they photographed an apparition of a young girl sitting at one of the tables in the upstairs Lounge Bar!

 

The Visitor Centre, Rochester

Rochester’s Visitor Centre is said to be haunted by two ghosts.

On one occasion the security guard was scared witless when he ventured into the centre’s cellar.

The lights switched themselves off and boxes of stationary mysteriously moved across the cellar floor on their own accord!

 

The Old Corn Exchange, Rochester

Just down the High Street from Chertsey Gate you’ll find the Old Corn Exchange.

The building dates back to 1698 when it was the entrance to the butchers’ market.

The façade which has a clock that dates from 1771 was a gift from Sir Cloudesly Shovell.

Behind the frontage is the Prince’s Hall which dates back to 1910.

The Old Corn Exchange is rumoured to be haunted…

One lady reported hearing eerie chamber music coming from the old bell tower.

And lights have been known to turn themselves on and off by their own accord.

The ghost of a little girl is thought to be responsible for the lights switching themselves on and off!

 

Cheldgate House, Rochester

A couple of doors down from the Old Corn Exchange you’ll find a tall Georgian building called Cheldgate House.

The building is said to be haunted by the ghost of a surly man from the 18th century.

Terrified witnesses have described his ghostly apparition as being bald headed and wearing a long waxed oilskin riding coat!

 

The Crooked Shop, Rochester

Opposite Cheldgate House is a building which the locals have nicknamed the Crooked Shop because it leans heavily to the right.

The Crooked Shop is said to be haunted by the ghost of a little girl who’s been seen at the upstairs windows pulling faces at shoppers walking by.

The building is also said to be haunted by the ghost of a Victorian man who’s been seen by terrified witnesses standing by the fireplace.

 

Eastgate House, Rochester

When Eastgate House was opened to the public as a museum it had a reputation for being haunted…

Spooked people walking pass Eastgate House would report seeing a ghostly face leering at them from the Victorian Room.

Terrified members of staff have been scared witless after seeing the ghostly apparition of a woman on the main stairs.

They describe her as wearing a long flowing grey dress.

It’s also been rumoured that the ghost of Charles Dickens himself has been seen sitting at his desk as well as looking through the shutters of his Swiss chalet!

 

Restoration House, Rochester

A ghostly apparition of a man has been witnessed to walk from the bed, across the room and through the wall of the bedroom that King Charles II slept in.

There’s a ghostly legend which says that a ghost of a young pregnant woman, probably a maid, is seen to run from the house in the middle of the night slamming shut the great door and heading off towards The Vines.

The house is also said to be haunted by the ghost of a Benedictine monk.

His ghostly apparition has been seen by witnesses to appear next to the fireplace and glide around the house!

 

Rochester Cathedral, Rochester

With such an historic building you probably won’t be too surprised to discover that the cathedral is said to be haunted…

In fact, legend says that the ghost of Charles Dickens himself has been seen wandering around the churchyard!

A spooked verger once reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a young girl walk the length of the nave.

Apparently she was wearing a blue blazer and disappeared through a wall at the spot that an old archway once existed!

A ghostly monk has also been seen by terrified witnesses in the crypt.

And phantom footsteps have been heard coming from the small kitchen area at the end of the passageway near to Gundulf’s Tower.

Some believe that the footsteps are created by the ghost of a former verger!

In 2008 a photograph was taken near the main entrance which showed a ghostly figure of a man of the cloth wearing dark clothing.

There have also been reports of the cathedral’s organ being played in the middle of the night by something or somebody unseen!

 

Rochester Castle, Rochester

In 2006 terrified witnesses reported seeing a ghostly man staring out of one of the castle’s windows.

The witnesses described the ghostly man as having white hair!

Earlier that year visitors to the castle reported seeing an eerie white mist suddenly appear near to the ladder in the castle’s cesspit.

A couple of years later another visitor was scared witless whilst standing next to the cesspit when they suddenly felt an icy hand touch them on the back of their neck!

In 2010 Irish visitors reported seeing the ghostly apparitions of two medieval looking men near to the flag tower.

Strange mists, orbs, bright white flashes, strange orange shapes, phantom footsteps, fleeting shadows, mysterious handprints and objects being move around on their own accord have all been reported by spooked members of staff and guests alike at the castle.

On one occasion a passer-by actually had some type of weird time slip experience when she walked pass the castle.

She saw it in a better state of repair with medieval banners hanging from the windows!

Local legend says that the ghost of Charles Dickens wanders the castle moat on certain nights of the year.

But he’s not the only ghost seen in the vicinity…

Duncan Livingstone was a local character who dressed up in tartan and played the bagpipes.

He had a young servant boy who would collect money for him from the crowd of people who watched him playing the bagpipes.

One day the young boy was tragically found murdered.

And because Duncan was known as being a drunkard with a bad temper, he was quickly arrested.

He was found guilty for the murder of the boy and was promptly hung at the old cattle market.

His body was later taken from the old cattle market to the castle where it was buried beneath its walls.

It’s now believed that his ghostly apparition also wanders around the castle moat on certain nights of the year!

The White Lady Ghost of Rochester Castle is said to be the spirit of Lady Blanche de Warenne who was tragically killed during the siege of 1264.

Legend says that she was engaged to be married to a crusader at the castle called Ralph de Capo.

Simon de Montford, Earl of Leicester attacked the castle on the Good Friday of 1264.

It’s said that one of his knights, Gilbert de Clare, had previously taken a liking to Lady Blanche but she had rejected him.

During the battle Gilbert de Clare dressed up in armour similar to Ralph de Capo and went looking for Lady Blanche in the castle.

Apparently he found her on the castle battlements and grabbed hold of her…

From another part of the castle Ralph de Capo saw the pair struggling together.

Quickly he fire off an arrow at Gilbert de Clare but it glanced off his armour and hit Lady Blanche in the chest killing her instantly!

Since this tragic incident it’s now said that her ghost haunts Rochester Castle.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen on the battlements and wandering around the upper parts of the castle often on a Good Friday!

She’s been described as wearing a white long flowing medieval style dress.

Strangely, another apparition has been witnessed in the same vicinity by both members of staff and spooked visitors alike.

The ghostly figure is of a man carrying a bow and arrow…

Maybe it’s the ghost of her betrothed Ralph de Capo!

Terrified visitors to the castle have reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a monk wandering around the place.

He’s described as wearing a dark habit with the hood up and is often seen in the chapel.

In 2010 a visitor to the castle took some photos of the empty chapel…

And she was totally shocked to discover that she had photographed what looked like the arm and shoulder of a monk dressed in a dark habit.

Historians have since revealed that there was once in fact an order of Benedictine monks at the castle.

And funnily enough they wore black habits!

Some witnesses who’ve seen the ghostly monk have also reported that he’d told them in an eerie voice to ‘Get Out!’ or ‘Go Away!’

 

The Vines, Rochester

Where Rochester’s Vines Lane and Crow Lane meet you’ll find an entrance to a Grade II listed park called The Vines.

The park gets its name from the days when it was used as a vineyard by the local monks of St Andrews Priory.

The Vines is known for its impressive avenue of London Plane trees which line a central path called the Broad Walk.

The park was a favourite of the author Charles Dickens who actually featured it in several of his novels.

Now the Vines is said to be haunted by a ghostly monk wearing a black habit.

His apparition has been seen by terrified witnesses wandering around the park in the middle of the night.

The park is also said to be haunted by an evil spirit which shows itself as a small dark mass with two glowing red eyes!

 

Coopers Arms, Rochester

The pub is said to be haunted by a ghostly monk who appears every November by walking through the wall of the bar.

He’s described as wearing a grey robe.

Legend says that he committed an unforgivable sin against the ancient order of the Brethren of Coopers.

For this he was walled up and left to die!

Sometimes his ghostly apparition is also seen in the cellar of the Coopers Arms.

His ghost has been blamed for smashing customer’s pints on the floor by sliding them along the bar counter until they fall off the end.

Members of staff and punters alike have also reported seeing another ghostly figure in the pub.

It’s of an old man with staring eyes!

 

St Bartholomew’s Hospital, Rochester

The porch of St Bartholomew’s Chapel is said to be haunted by the ghost of a dishevelled looking figure.

Many people believe the poor figure is the ghost of a leprosy victim.

A lot of paranormal activity happens in and around the outpatients department.

In fact some people say that Consulting Room 2 has been closed because of the strange activity that took place in it!

Sudden temperature drops, doors opening and closing on their own accord, phantom footsteps, chairs being flung across the floor and lights being mysteriously turned on and off have all been reported to happen within the department.

The ghostly apparition of a nurse has been seen sitting in the special care ward for babies.

She’s been described as wearing a cap and a long grey uniform with a ruffled neckline.

Legend says that she tends to appear next to a baby who’s sadly about to die!

St Bart’s is said to have a couple of ghosts of little boys that wander around the place.

The first ghostly little boy is said to be aged between six and eight years old and is often heard crying.

Spooked witnesses have described him as wearing a grey uniform consisting of shorts, long socks and a tank top over a scruffy white t-shirt.

Legend says that he’s looking for his mother!

The other ghostly little boy who’s often seen by spooked witnesses at the hospital is of a little boy wearing a red jumper.

He’s often seen sitting on windowsills dotted throughout the hospital.

A ghost of a lady dressed in a long white dress is often witnessed sitting at the end of patient’s beds.

Another ghost of a young lady who’s been described as smartly dressed has been witnessed in certain parts of the hospital.

She’s believed not to be a ghost of a former patient or staff member but actually a former visitor!

Members of staff have also been scared witless after seeing the ghostly apparition of an old lady walk down corridors and then suddenly disappear through walls.

Strangely enough on one occasion a ghost of a cavalier was seen chatting away with a patient!

The cavalier was dressed in a white frilly shirt with a black plumed hat, trousers and long boots.

He was carrying a sword and had long dark hair with a moustache and a beard.

Apparently the cavalier had said to the patient that he’d entered the hospital via a tunnel from Chatham Dockyard!

 

The Rising Sun, Rochester

On the corner of Delce Road and King Street in Rochester you’ll find a pub called the Rising Sun.

The pub dates back to 1858 and has a reputation for being haunted.

Former members of staff have reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a woman.

Her ghost has been described as wearing a long flowing dress and glides along the upstairs corridors.

Apparently, witnesses reported that she glares at them!

The Rising Sun is also said to be haunted by the ghost of a Victorian man who sadly committed suicide by cutting his own throat in the pub’s outside lavatory.

 

Love Lane, Rochester

Love Lane is a narrow lane in Rochester which connects St Margaret’s Street with a green next to St Margaret’s Church called Churchfields.

Many people who’ve walked along the lane after dark have remarked that they find it spooky.

In fact they feel like they’re being watched!

In the 1950s, a local dog walker was walking along the lane near to where the ruins of some bombed out houses stood when suddenly his dog started to play up.

He looked over towards the ruinous bombed out buildings and was shocked to see a ghostly apparition of a young woman in a white blouse.

The spooky thing was…

He could only see the top half of her body!

The woman in the white blouse is a common apparition often witnessed along Love Lane and in the nearby open green spaces of the Esplanade and Churchfields.

It’s always the top half of her body which is seen, never her bottom half!

 

Boley Hill House and Lodge, Rochester

You’ll find the splendid Boley Hill House and Lodge located just opposite Rochester Castle on the junction of Boley Hill and St Margaret’s Street.

The Grade II listed seven-roomed mansion dates back to the early 19th century.

Boley Hill House and Lodge is rumoured to be haunted by a ghostly female figure…

The young daughter of a former owner of the house reported that an apparition of a Grey Lady would wake her from her sleep by coming into her bedroom and sitting on the edge of her bed!

 

Old Hall, Rochester

Located on Boley Hill next to the grand white building of Satis House you’ll find the Old Hall.

The timbered framed Old Hall dates back to the late 13th century when it was first built for the Skipwell family.

The Grade II* listed Old Hall is one of the oldest houses in Rochester.

It’s said that King Henry VIII first met his fourth wife Anne of Cleves at the house!

Local legend says that the Old Hall is haunted…

A spooked former owner witnessed a ghostly apparition of a woman at the foot of her bed one night.

And terrified witnesses have also reported hearing phantom music coming from some of its rooms!

The ghostly music was described as a type of Italian vocal chamber music called Madrigal.

Madrigal was popular in England during the 16th and 17th centuries.

 

Woodhams & Co Brewery, Rochester

Where Rochester’s Victoria Street and East Row meet, you’ll find an old brewery building.

The building dates back to 1750 when it was first established by Woodhams & Co Ltd.

The brewery closed in 1918 but the building was later used as a cash and carry.

And it was during this time that the building got a reputation for being haunted…

Terrified members of staff reported hearing phantom footsteps and feeling a strange presence whilst they worked in the tower part of the building!

Many believe the presence felt in the old brewery building was the spirit of a former brewery worker who tragically drowned in a vat of beer.

 

Rochester Independent College, Rochester

Opposite Jackson’s Field on New Road you’ll find an impressive looking building from the early 19th century.

The Grade II listed building is now owned by Rochester Independent College but it once housed the Good Companions Club.

It was during the time it was used as a club that the building got a reputation for being haunted…

Passers-by would often report seeing a ghostly apparition of a tall elegant man wearing a tricorne hat staring out of one of the upstairs windows.

Terrified members of staff also reported seeing the ghostly man wringing his hands and sighing deeply.

And they would often blame him for moving items of furniture around the place!

Many people believe that he was the ghost of a former owner of the large 19th century smock mill which once stood behind the house.

 

Old House at Home, Sheerness

Along Sheerness High Street you’ll find a 17th century pub with the unusual name of the Old House at Home.

The pub has a reputation amongst the locals for being haunted…

It’s said to be haunted by a ghost who’s been blamed for moving furniture around the place and making eerie noises on the stairs.

The terrified owners of the pub reported that they’ve been thrown out of their bed in the middle of the night by an unseen entity!

And on one occasion a barmaid was hit on her head by a thrown barrel top when she entered the basement.

The eerie thing was that she was the only person down in the basement at the time.

 

The Red Lion, Blue Town

Along the High Street in Blue Town, Sheerness you’ll find the historic Red Lion pub.

The weather boarded pub is believed to be one of the oldest pubs in the area.

It dates back to the late 1700s when it started life out as the Swan Inn.

The Red Lion is said to be haunted by the ghosts of a lady of the night and her faithful dog.

Paranormal investigators have conducted vigils at the pub.

They’ve reported the eerie sound of phantom footsteps walking along the upstairs landing.

And some of the team members actually felt the feeling of sea sickness come over them whilst investigating the building!

 

Sheerness Docks, Sherness

One early morning in 1966 a deckhand witnessed a ghostly apparition walking down the dock road towards the custom buildings.

He described the ghostly figure as a tall man in Elizabethan clothing.

Apparently he was walking above the road surface and not on it.

And when he got near the Garrison Port Fort he disappeared through a wall!

There’s a disturbing ghost story associated with the dockyard church at Garrison Port Fort.

Terrified witnesses reported seeing a ghostly figure hanging from a tree in front of the church.

The witnesses reported that there was no actual rope just a ghostly figure hanging in mid-air under the tree!

 

Minster Abbey Gatehouse, Minster Abbey

The gatehouse is said to be haunted by a ghostly apparition of a lady in a full length light coloured dress.

Some witnesses describe the dress as being white whilst the majority of wtnesses report it as being grey.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen walking from outside the Highlanders pub, across the road and up towards the church and gatehouse.

Many believe that the Grey Lady ghost is a spirit of a former nun from the abbey.

In the 1970s shocked visitors to the gatehouse witnessed a ghostly female figure walk straight through the gate and then disappear into thin air…

This eerie sighting was in the middle of the day!

Phantom monks have also been seen around the Minster…

Witnesses have reported seeing a phantom monks sitting under a tree near the church reading a book!

In the 1950s, a young girl reported seeing ghostly monks at the Minster on many occasions.

She’d witnessed the phantom monks near to a gate which leads to the garden of the Minster Vicarage.

The gate was actually near to the location of an ancient monks’ door which led into the oldest part of the abbey church!

It’s believed that two monks were actually present at the Minster during the reign of Henry I of England.

One was a confessor to the nuns and the other was a curate.

 

The King’s Arms, Minster

You’ll find the King’s Arms pub located along Minster’s High Street.

The King’s Arms pub is rumoured to be haunted by the ghost of a nun.

Her spirit is believed to be responsible for the light phantom footsteps which are sometimes heard by spooked witnesses coming down the pub’s stairs.

 

Warden Manor, Warden

Sir John Sawbridge owned the Warden Manor in the 17th century.

He was a local magistrate and surprisingly also a leader of a smuggling gang who used the property for their illicit trade.

One night he was on his way to inspect a bottle of smuggled French brandy when his horse suddenly bolted and he was thrown to the ground.

He wasn’t found until the next day and he later died from the injuries he sustained during the fall from his horse.

His ghostly apparition riding a black phantom stallion is now said to haunt the local woods around the manor!

The nursery at the manor is said to be haunted by the ghost a female figure called Jenny.

She’s said to have lost her baby in childbirth and then died shortly afterwards.

He mourning ghost is said to haunt the nursey on dark nights!

The manor is also said to be haunted by the ghostly apparition of an elderly lady dressed in old-fashioned clothing.

She’s been seen by terrified witnesses to walk through the walls of the manor house!

 

Eastchurch, Isle of Sheppey

In October 1769 a local woman called Grace Davis sadly drowned herself in the Old House pond.

In those days it was law for the deceased to be buried wrapped in wool.

One October night in the late 1980s a couple were driving through the village when suddenly they saw a lady wrapped in wool standing right in front of them.

They stopped the car and got out to see if the woman was alright only to find that she had totally disappeared into thin air!

It’s now said that ghost of Grace shows herself in the village on the anniversary of her death.

&nbsp

Shurland Hall, Isle of Sheppey

Shurland Hall is said to be haunted by a ghostly lady in a silk black dress who’s said to appear at midnight.

The apparition of a big black dog has also been seen at the hall.

And the eerie sound of phantom horses hoofs have been heard outside the front door.

There’s also been reports of the hall’s bells mysteriously ringing and the handles of locked doors turning on their own accord!

A ghostly female figure has been seen wandering around the grounds of the hall.

This phantom figure is said to be the ghost of Grace Davis who drowned herself in the Old House pond in 1769.

In 2013 a local author was writing a book about Shurland Hall and she took some photos of it for her book.

Apparently in one of her photos a white figure of woman can be seen in one of the hall’s top windows.

Some say the figure is a ghost of a former maid!

 

St Thomas the Apostle Church, Harty

Harty’s St Thomas the Apostle church can be found off the Harty Ferry Road close to one of the local farms.

The Grade II* listed church is believed to date back to the period of the late 11th century or early 12th century.

The church is rumoured to be haunted…

Spooked witnesses have reported seeing ghostly figures wandering around the outside of the church.

Some people believe that these shadowy figures were the ghosts of seamen who had tragically drowned in the waters of the Swale Estuary and had been buried in unmarked graves at the church!

 

The Walnut Tree Inn, Aldington

Where Forge Hill comes out onto the Roman Road in the Kent village of Aldington you’ll find the historic Walnut Tree Inn.

The ancient pub was originally built as a home during the reign of Richard II in the 14th century.

It later became a brew-house in the 17th century.

During the early 1800s the inn became notorious for being the stronghold of an infamous Kent smuggling gang known as the Aldington Gang.

The gang’s leaders were Cephas Quested and George Ransley.

Some say the ghost of George Ransley haunts the pub today but it’s most probably the spirit of another smuggler who had his throat slit in the pub during a poker game which got out of control.

It’s said that his body was unceremoniously dump down the pub’s well!

In 2004, the landlady reported that her children told her that a man in their bedroom had given them both ‘a piece’!

The spooked landlady also reported that the bar bell would mysteriously ring by itself and glasses would suddenly fall from their shelves for no apparent reason.

Witnesses have also reported seeing and hearing phantom Victorian children playing in the bar area of the pub.

 

Star Inn, Ashford

You’ll find the Grade II listed Star Inn on East Hill in the Kent town of Ashford.

The 18th century pub is said to be haunted by a female ghost who the staff members have nicknamed Doris.

Doris has been blamed for creating the phantom footsteps which are sometimes heard walking around the pub.

On one occasion a local punter was drinking in the pub when suddenly his dog started to bark…

The dog seemed to be barking at an unseen presence within the bar!

One day the Star’s landlady was down in the pub’s cellar rectifying a mistake she had made with the beer barrels when she suddenly she felt a tap on her shoulder and a voice said to her…

“You’ve put the wrong barrel on!”

The spooked landlady spun around to only to discover that she was totally alone in the cellar.

 

St Augustine’s Priory, Bilsington

St Augustine’s Priory is said to be haunted by phantom monks.

There’s a ghostly tale which happened when the priory was part of a farmhouse in the 1930s.

A young couple stopped at the priory to ask for help after their pony that was pulling their trap lost its shoe.

The husband went off with the farmer’s wife to get the pony re-shoed whilst the wife waited for them in one of the priory’s room with the farmer’s little terrier dog as company.

After sometime the dog suddenly started to whimper and the woman witnessed a dusty haze appear in the room.

Suddenly a procession of ghostly monks walked across the room towards a hidden staircase which they climbed and slowly disappearing from sight.

When the farmer’s wife came back the terrified woman told her of her ghostly ordeal.

The farmer’s wife wasn’t too concerned as the procession of ghostly monks was a common sight…

Apparently they would often appear at six o’clock!

One of the Black Cannons who once was a resident at the prior was said to have been bricked up behind a wall as a punishment for committing a terrible crime.

Some witnesses have reported hearing a knocking noise coming from the priory walls and believe that it’s the ghost of the Black Cannon trying to escape.

The priory is also said to be haunted by a woman who was murdered by her husband after she dropped and smashed a tray full of china.

Locals believe a lot of the ghostly tales associated with St Augustine’s Priory were made up and spread by smugglers keen to kept people away from the priory.

You see, in the 1820s the ruinous priory buildings were said to have been used by smuggling gangs to hide their illicit goods!

 

Chilham Castle, Chilham

In 1972 the castle held a weekend banquet for tourists.

During the banquet a young female member of staff saw an elderly lady in a medieval dress walking towards the old wall.

Thinking the old lady was a guest in fancy dress she approached her to say hello…

Well she got the shock of her life when she saw the medieval looking woman suddenly vanish into the old wall!

A couple of months later two terrified witnesses reported seeing the ghostly apparition of an elderly lady wearing a beautiful medieval style dress standing by the old wall.

A few years after that sighting a TV crew were filming by the castle stairs when suddenly one of the actresses was pushed so hard by an unseen force that she stumbled awkwardly and broke her ankle!

Eerie sounds and sudden temperature drops have also been reported to happen in the kitchen and in the lady’s cloakroom.

Local legend says that in the 14th century a lady friend of the owner was actually bricked up behind a one of the castle’s walls.

 

White Horse Inn, Chilham

You’ll find the 15th century White Horse Inn situated in the picturesque square of the Kent village of Chilham.

The inn was actually once the local vicarage and is said to be haunted by a former vicar who was ejected from his job in 1662 for his anti-church and pro Cromwell views.

A ghostly apparition of a grey-haired old man dressed in a black gown and gaiters has been witnessed with his hands behind his back staring into the roaring fire of the pub’s inglenook fireplace.

His apparition is typically seen at about ten o’clock in the morning.

Pint glasses have been reported to suddenly fall off their shelves only to land unbroken and upright on the pub’s floor!

During alterations to the White Horse in 1956 two well persevered male skeletons were found buried two feet under the pub’s kitchen floor.

Many people believe they were soldiers who died at the Battle of Chilham during the Wat Tyler rebellion.

It’s said that the ghosts of the two soldiers also haunt the pub!

 

Godinton House, Ashford

The house is said to be haunted by the apparition of a lady in a black silk dress.

Apparently she’s often witnessed on the staircase of the house.

Local legend says that she’s the spirit of a family member who had an inappropriate relationship with the resident priest and was later found murdered!

Another ghostly woman is also said to roam the stately home.

Her apparition is described as wearing a white dress.

She’s said to be the spirit of another family member who was imprisoned in a room which had its windows and doors bricked up!

Legend says that many years later a female skeleton was discovered in an old hidden room which later became known as the Blue Bedroom.

The Blue Bedroom was said to have had a portrait of a young woman in a white dress hanging in it.

It’s said that after dark the woman’s spirit would emerge from the portrait and roam the house!

 

Chequers on the Green, High Halden

Opposite the green in the Kent village of High Halden you’ll find the Chequers on the Green pub.

The Grade II listed building dates back to the 17th century although parts of the building are much older dating to the 15th century.

The pub was formerly known as the Chequers Inn and was said to be frequented by smugglers in the 18th century.

Local legend says that some of the old oak beams and oak flooring in the upstairs part of the pub are actually from old galleons.

The pub is said to be haunted by quite a few ghosts…

A paranormal group investigating the pub reported it was haunted by the ghosts of a drayman, a cook, two women and some children!

 

Kennington Hall, Ashford

If you head north out of Ashford along the Canterbury Road you’ll pass a fantastic looking three storey red brick building called Kennington Hall.

The Grade II listed hall dates back to the 18th century and was once owned by the Carter family.

In the past the hall had a reputation for being haunted…

It was said that a ghostly apparition of a White Lady would show herself at the hall.

But her apparition hasn’t been witnessed for a long time.

The other haunting said to take place at Kennington Hall, well in a field next to the hall to be precise, is that of a phantom coach.

Like the ghost of the White Lady, the phantom coach hasn’t been reported lately either!

 

Repton Manor, Ashford

Spooked soldiers stationed at Repton Manor often reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a woman on the staircase of the building and in its garden.

They described her ghostly apparition as being dress in white and carrying a candle.

Local legend says that she was the spirit of a woman who was murdered at the manor by a former owner of the house!

Repton Manor was also said to be haunted by a ghost of a monk…

Terrified witnesses reported seeing his ghostly apparition in the kitchen of the house!

These two ghosts were mainly reported during the Second World War period.

And sadly there haven’t been too many sightings of them recently.

 

The Farriers Arms, Mersham

You’ll find the historic Farriers Arms pub situated along Church Road in the Kent village of Mersham.

The Grade II listed pub dates back to 1606.

It was originally used as a farm which later had a blacksmiths added to it.

The building became a pub in the early part of the 19th century.

It’s said that during those early years the upstairs of the pub was actually used as a brothel.

And the ghosts of some of the women who worked there actually haunt it today.

The Farriers Arms is also said to be haunted by the ghost of a man who tragically died in a road traffic accident in the 1970s.

 

Park Wood, Pluckley

There was once a wooded area in Pluckley called Park Wood where it’s said that in the 18th century a local army colonel sadly committed suicide by hanging himself from one of the trees.

Today Park Wood has mostly been cleared but in its time terrified witnesses reported seeing the ghost of the colonel either wandering through the wood or hanging from a tree.

 

Fright Corner, Pluckley

Along the Smarden Bell Road you’ll come across a junction near a wooded area called Frith Wood.

This junction is called Frith Corner but it’s actually pronounced as Fright Corner.

The corner is said to be haunted by the ghost of an 18th century highwayman who was killed during a duel at the spot.

It’s said that his opponent ran a sword through him so forcefully that he was pinned to a nearby tree!

Local legend says that on certain nights of the year you can actually hear the phantom highwayman’s anguishing screams ringing out through the darkness.

 

The Old Ruined Windmill, Pluckley

There was once an old wooden windmill in the village which dated back to the 19th century.

In 1939 it was hit by lighting resulting in it being burning to the ground.

It’s said that in the 1930s the miller Richard ‘Dicky’ Buss committed suicide at the windmill by hanging himself.

And local legend now states that just before a thunderstorm is due in the village the ghost of Dicky Buss shows himself in the area of the old ruined windmill!

 

Greystones, Pluckley

On the outskirts of the village is a large white house called Greystones.

The house dates back to 1863 when it was originally called Rectory Cottage and the home of the local curate.

The grounds of the house were once said to be haunted by a phantom monk but his ghostly apparition hasn’t been seen at Greystones since the 1920s!

 

Rose Court Cottage, Pluckley

Near to Greystones is another house which has a ghostly tale to tell.

Rose Court cottage is said to be haunted by the ghost called the Tudor Lady.

Legend says that she was a friend of the phantom monk who haunted Greystones.

And she sadly committed suicide by drinking a potion made from poisonous ivy berries.

Her ghostly apparition is said to walk through the cottage’s garden with her two dogs beside her between the hours of 4pm and 5pm…

This is said to be the time that she committed suicide!

 

The Dering Arms, Pluckley

Close to the village railway station you’ll find the Dering Arms.

The historic building dates back to the 1840s when it was first used as a hunting lodge for the Dering Estate.

Today the Dering Arms is run as a restaurant and a B&B.

The restaurant has a reputation for being haunted by an old lady.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen sitting at a table by one of the restaurant’s windows.

Witnesses have described her as wearing a period style dress with a bonnet.

She’s said to look so lifelike that witnesses only realise that she’s actually a ghost when they see her vanish into thin air!

 

Maltman’s Hill, Pluckley

Terrified witnesses have reported seeing a phantom coach and horses being driven by a headless coachman.

The ghostly vehicle is primarily seen on Maltman’s Hill but it’s also been witnessed in other parts of the village.

 

The Old Brickworks Pluckley

In the 19th century a man tragically died after falling into a clay pit at the old brickworks.

Local legend says that on quiet nights at the old brickworks site his ghost can be heard screaming in agony!

 

Dering Wood, Pluckley

Some people have reported hearing spine chilling ghostly screams coming from the woodland known as Dering Wood which is located just on the outskirts of the village.

Many people believe that the ghostly screams are from the spirits of past travellers who got lost in the woods and died there!

 

St Nicholas Church, Pluckley

Along the Street in the village you’ll come across the 13th century St Nicholas church.

The churchyard, the Dering family vault and inside the church is said to be the haunt of a ghost called the White Lady.

Witnesses describe the White Lady as being young and beautiful.

Legend says that she was once the wife of Lord Dering!

It’s also said that the White Lady once haunted the library of her family home Surrenden Dering.

St Nicholas churchyard is also said to be haunted by a ghostly woman in a red dress called the Red Lady.

She’s said to be the ghost of another Lady Dering who tragically lost her baby in childbirth.

Her ghost has been seen wandering the churchyard in search of the unmarked grave of her stillborn baby.

Lady Dering was buried in a lead coffin in the church crypt with a red rose placed on top of her coffin.

St Nicholas church has another ghost associated with it…

Witnesses have reported that an apparition of a large white dog has accompanied them whilst they visited the church.

The ghostly dog has been witnessed both in the church and the churchyard!

 

Dick Buss’s Lane, Pluckley

Dicky Buss’s Lane is said to be haunted by the ghost of a schoolmaster who sadly committed suicide in the lane by hanging himself from a nearby tree.

The tragic incident happened shortly after the First World War.

The poor local children discovered his body hanging from a tree whilst they were on their way to school.

His ghostly apparition dressed in a frock coat and striped trouser has been seen hanging from a tree along the lane!

 

Pinnock Bridge, Pluckley

A misty pink apparition of an old gypsy woman who once lived in the village has been seen on the stretch of road near Pinnock Bridge.

It’s said that she made a living by selling watercress she harvested from the Pinnock Stream.

And that she tragically died when she fell asleep whilst smoking her clay pipe in bed.

You see, the bed was made from straw and it ignited resulting in the old lady being burnt to death!

 

The Black Horse, Pluckley

You’ll find the historic Black Horse pub along the Street in the centre of the village.

The building dates back to the 1470s when it was first used as a dry moated farmhouse for the Dering family.

The pub has a reputation for being very haunted.

Items of clothing have been reported to mysteriously disappear then reappear at a later date.

And pint glasses would move about on their own accord.

Many people believe that the mischievous spirit responsible for these ghostly pranks is a ghost of a little girl called Jessie.

 

The Blacksmith Arms, Pluckley

The building which was once the Blacksmith Arms is located at the junction of Smarden Bell Road and Smarden Road.

The Blacksmith Arms had a reputation for being haunted by many ghosts…

In fact, its previous names were the Spectre’s Arms and the Ghost’s Arms!

The building is said to date back to the 1300s and later became an alehouse in 1627.

It’s said to be haunted by the ghosts of a small boy, a Tudor maid, a coachman and a cavalier.

When the pub was opened to the public witnesses reported seeing the ghostly coachman staring into the fire of the public lounge.

And the cavalier ghost was said to roam around the upstairs rooms of the pub.

Like many old pubs up and down the country the Blacksmith Arms is sadly no longer trading and is now used as a private residence.

 

The Rose and Crown, Mundy Bois

You’ll find the Rose and Crown pub along the Mundy Bois Road in the hamlet of Mundy Bois.

The pub dates back to the 17th century.

It has gain reputation for being haunted…

A former landlord reported hearing eerie voices whilst he was alone down in the cellar one day.

Items would mysteriously disappear then reappear somewhere else in the pub at a later date.

Jugs and tankards in the pub and pots and pans in the kitchen would often swing on their hooks and rattle on their own accord!

 

The Blue Anchor, Ruckinge

You’ll find the Blue Anchor pub along the B2067 in the centre of the Kent village of Ruckinge.

The pub dates back to the 1730s.

The Blue Anchor’s landlord believes that the pub’s cellar may be haunted.

A sliding door within the pub has been known to close on its own accord.

Séances have been conducted within the Blue Anchor with spirits being contacted during them.

But it’s hasn’t been proven that the contacted spirits were actually residential to the pub!

 

The Kings Head, Shadoxhurst

You’ll find the Kings Head pub along Woodchurch Road in the Kent village of Shadoxhurst.

The building dates back to 1645 when it was first built as a home.

It later became a public house in the 1800s.

The pub is said to be located on both a ley-line and an underground stream.

The Kings Head has a reputation for being haunted by the ghosts of two little girls.

Witnesses have described the ghostly girls as wearing clothes which are pre-Victorian.

They tend to haunt the back room of the pub with paranormal activity peaking during the Christmas period.

The ghostly girls have been blamed for moving items around the pub.

And witnesses have reported hearing them laughing and giggling!

The landlord actually once saw an apparition of a little girl standing next to the pub’s fireplace.

And when his son was young he had an imaginary friend who he played with in the pub.

There’s another ghost story associate with the Kings Head of a Victorian old man who suddenly appears in the bar.

And finally, there’s the local legend of a phantom coach and horses which is said to be driven by a headless coachman across the field next to the pub!

 

The Chequers Inn, Smarden

You’ll find the Chequers Inn along the Street in the centre of the picturesque Kent village of Smarden.

The Grade II listed Chequers Inn is an old coaching inn which dates back to the 14th century.

The inn has a reputation for being haunted by a murder victim…

Now there are a few variations on this ghost story but the most common tale is that a soldier from the Napoleonic wars was stabbed to death during a robbery attempt in one of the pub’s rooms.

Some stories say that he was murdered by a young village woman who befriended him in order to steal his money.

His ghost is now said to haunt some of the bedrooms at the pub.

Members of staff have reported that some of the beds look like they’ve been slept in when in fact no guests have stayed in those bedrooms.

They’ve also reported that windows and doors have mysteriously opened on their own accord.

And cutlery has gone missing!

Spooked witnesses have also reported hearing phantom footsteps walking around the inn.

One guest reported that she had seen a ghostly apparition of a man standing by her bedroom door when she woke up in the middle of the night.

Apparently she called out to the man but he simply vanished into thin air!

That guest’s sister also reported that she had felt a burning sensation in her back during the night and when she awoke in the morning she discover a mark in the shape of a cross on her back.

 

The Woolpack Inn, Smeeth

Along Church Road in the Kent village of Smeeth you’ll find the Woolpack Inn.

The Woolpack isn’t that old, it was actually built in 1937.

It replaced an older inn which was sadly destroyed by fire.

The original inn dated back to the 1600s and was located where the new pub’s car park is now.

The old inn was said to have been once a favourite hangout for the local smugglers.

The present day Woolpack Inn is said to be haunted by two ghosts…

One is said to be the ghost of a little girl aged between eight and ten years old.

And the other ghost is said to be that of an old man.

The apparition of the young girl has been seen in the bar area of the pub skipping towards the kitchen.

She’s said to be wearing a nightdress.

The elderly man’s apparition has been seen where the old entrance of the pub used to be.

Witnesses say he has a bicycle with him!

The owners of the Woolpack Inn have also reported hearing table and chairs being moved about in the bar area late at night.

But when they investigate they find that nobody is in the bar area and the furniture is where it should be.

 

The William Caxton, Tenterden

You’ll find the historic William Caxton pub at West Cross in the Kent town of Tenterden.

The pub is named after the local 15th century merchant, diplomat, writer and printer William Caxton.

The pub is very old, it actually dates back to 1580.

And it’s located on an old crossroads where hangings once took place with the deceased bodies being publicly displayed from gibbets as a warning.

Locally the William Caxton pub has a reputation for being haunted…

It’s said that the pub’s cellar and some of the upstairs rooms where it’s rumoured a suicide once took place are haunted!

 

Boys Hall, Willesborough

If you cast your mind back to 2007 you may remember the Most Haunted gang investigated a stunning Kent Jacobean manor house called Boys Hall.

You’ll find the Grade II listed hall along the Boys Hall Road in the village of Willesborough.

The historic Boys Hall was first built in 1616 for the Boys family or the De Bois as they were originally known as.

The hall has a reputation for being haunted by the ghost of a young woman.

Legend says that a charismatic Irishman was killed in a secret dual at the hall after he tried to seduce the wife of an English army officer.

Many years later the lovelorn wife returned to the hall to discover a skeleton dressed in the Irishman’s clothes hidden under the floor.

The strange thing was… it was a woman’s skeleton!

Boys Hall is also said to be haunted by the ghosts of a stable master called Thomas and a drunk called John.

Spooked witnesses have reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a woman in white wandering around the hall.

They’ve also reports hearing phantom footsteps walking around the place and hearing the sounds of an unseen dog scratching at one of the bedroom doors.

If you fancy visiting the hall the good news is that it’s now opened to the public and is available as a wedding venue.

 

White Hill, Wye

To the north-east of Ashford in Kent you’ll find a little village called Wye.

One early morning a local coach driver was travelling to work along White Hill to the north-west of the village.

As he rounded a bend he was shocked to see a young woman standing in the middle of the road.

He didn’t have enough time to react and hit the woman.

The strange thing was, as she rolled across his bonnet she looked at him and smiled!

The coach driver stopped his car and got out to help the woman.

But to his surprise he couldn’t find her anywhere!

He called the local police and they couldn’t find her either.

This is when it dawn on him that he must have hit a ghost.

He described the ghostly woman as being in her mid-thirties with long blonde hair and wearing a long dark coat.

 

The Kings Head, Wye

You’ll find the Kings Head pub along Church Street in the Kent village of Wye.

The Kings Head is an old pub which dates back to 1870.

It has a reputation amongst the locals for being haunted.

In particle Room 202 is said to be the centre of the paranormal activity.

The haunting started many years ago when a traveller man died during a bare-knuckle fight and his body was brought to the Kings Head where it was placed in the cellar.

After the pathologist and the coroner pronounced that the death was an act of unlawful killing the man’s body was buried in the local churchyard.

And the deceased wake was held in one of the upper rooms of the Kings Head.

Spooked witnesses at the pub have reported seeing a ghostly mist walking through the doors of the building!

 

Old Romney Priory, New Romney

Along Ashford Road in the small Kent town of New Romney you’ll find a very old stone building.

Behind that building are the ruins of a mediaeval Cistercian Priory which was founded in the 13th Century.

These ruinous buildings are what remain of the old Romney Priory or St John’s Priory.

The old priory has a reputation amongst the locals for being haunted by the odd ghostly monk or two.

Extreme drops in temperature and the sound of eerie whispering, strange tapping noises and phantom footsteps have all been reported by spooked witnesses visiting the old priory site.

 

The New Inn, New Romney

You’ll find the historic New Inn situated along New Romney’s High Street.

The Georgian New Inn is actually quiet old as the structure dates back to 1381.

Local legend says that in the 1700s a young woman tragically committed suicide at the New Inn by hanging herself.

And now her ghost haunts the passageways, rooms and bar areas of the pub.

A former landlord reported that he once saw her ghostly figure walking across the pub’s bar area.

And in 1996 another witnessed reported seeing a dark figure walk towards him from the bar whilst he was in the kitchen!

 

Warren Inn, New Romney

You’ll find the Victorian Warren Inn along the Dymchurch Road to the north-east of the Kent town of New Romney.

The Warren Inn started trading back in 1860.

The pub is said to be haunted by a ghost who the members of staff call Old Sid.

It’s believed that Old Sid once run the pub in the 1950s but when times became financially hard he sadly committed suicide in an upstairs room of the Warren Inn.

Old Sid’s ghost has been blamed for most of the paranormal activity which takes place in the pub.

Witnesses have reported severe temperature drops, objects being moved or going missing, exploding lightbulbs, phantom footsteps and object being thrown by someone unseen.

It seems that Old Sid isn’t the only ghost at the Warren Inn…

One day a barmaid was scared witless after seeing an apparition of a huge black dog standing in the pub!

 

The Ship Inn, Dymchurch

Along the High Street of the Kent village of Dymchurch you’ll find the historic Ship Inn.

The Ship Inn dates back the 1530 and was a favourite watering hole amongst the local fishermen and smugglers.

The pub has a reputation for being haunted by the ghost of a young girl who once lived there.

Local legend says that she was jilted at the altar by her husband to be.

And she then returned to her home at the Ship Inn where she sadly committed suicide in despair.

Her ghost is now said to wander up and down the Ship Inn’s corridors.

 

The Pilot Inn, Lydd-on-Sea

You’ll find the Pilot Inn along Battery Road in the Kent village of Lydd-on-Sea.

The present day pub is rather new but the original Pilot Inn dated back to the 17th century.

You see, a Spanish schooner called the Alfresia was lured aground in 1633 by local wreckers.

The crew were murdered and the ship’s cargo stolen by smugglers.

The timbers of the ship were used to build the original Pilot Inn which lasted up until the 1950s.

By then the deterioration of the wooden structure was so bad that it had to be knocked down.

Some of the salvage timbers of the old Pilot Inn were saved and have been used in the bar area of the new pub.

The new pub has a reputation for being haunted but not by the ghosts of murdered Spanish sailors but by a Grey Lady.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen by witnesses near the pub’s toilets.

One time, a guest with a shocked look on his face came out of the toilets saying that he’s seen a ghost of a woman wearing a grey dress looking back at him in the mirror!

 

Greyfriars Chapel, Canterbury

Close to Stour Street in Canterbury you’ll find the 13th century Greyfriars Chapel.

The chapel dates back to 1267 and was the first Franciscan friary in England.

It was dissolved in 1538 and is the only building now remaining of that order in England.

Spooked witnesses have reported seeing ghostly monks in and around the Chapel’s graveyard.

Parishioners have also reported hearing a phantom choir singing within the building.

And a ghostly stooping monk has been seen walking and then suddenly running in terror through the cloister garden.

Witnesses have described him as tired looking but his feet cannot be seen as they disappear into the ground.

A ghostly candlelight has often been seen late at night in one of the top windows of the Assisi Cottage.

Some say that the candle is produced by the ghost of a workman from eight hundred years ago who fell to his death whilst he worked on the monastery.

 

Marlowe Arcade, Canterbury

Along St Margaret’s Street in Canterbury you’ll find a modern shopping arcade called Marlowe Arcade.

The arcade dates from the 1980s but it was actually built on the site of the historical Fountain Hotel.

The Fountain Hotel dated back to 1323 but it was destroyed by fire in 1942 during a bombing raid after it was hit by an incendiary bomb dropped by the German Luftwaffe.

It’s said that over three hundred people who were attending a celebration tragically died in the hotel that night!

Whilst the Marlowe Arcade was being built spooked workmen reported phantom footsteps following them around the site.

They also reported seeing their tools and building material move on their own accord.

Members of staff from a music store where the hotel’s main ballroom once stood have reported hearing the eerie sounds of chandeliers crashing to the ground and running phantom footsteps.

They’ve also reported smelling the odour of acrid smoke!

 

Westgate, Canterbury

The scheduled monument and Grade I listed Westgate is an ancient medieval gatehouse which you’ll find at the end of St Dunstan’s Street in Canterbury.

Westgate dates back to 1379 and is the largest surviving city gatehouse in England.

The gatehouse has a reputation for being haunted…

Recently a ghostly figure was seen walking across the old iron bridge by a terrified passer-by.

In the distant past when the gatehouse was used as a prison, the iron bridge was often crossed by condemned men!

A council worker once had a terrifying experience in the Westgate when he was working late one night…

He heard what he thought was someone dragging a dead body down the stone steps on the right hand side of the tower.

Scared witless, he ran to the main staircase to make his escape but found it’s door to be bolted firmly shut and icy cold to the touch.

That’s when he heard the phantom footsteps of three or four people descending the staircase from the above floor and heading towards him.

Suddenly the door’s bolt freed itself and he fled the building in terror.

Since then, the Council hasn’t let anybody work after dark in the gatehouse!

 

Sudbury Tower, Canterbury

The tower named after the Archbishop of Canterbury Simon of Sudbury who was beheaded by an angry mob during the Peasants Revolt in 1381.

The tower is reputed to be haunted by the ghost of the Archbishop himself.

In the 1920s the resident of the tower reported that the ghost of Simon of Sudbury visited him one night.

Apparently he’d retired to bed when suddenly there were three knocks at the door.

Although the door was bolted firmly shut, it open on its own accord and a man entered.

The resident reported that the man seemed friendly and was very lifelike…

He had a greying square cut beard and was wearing period clothing.

The ghostly figure bowed three times to him before he disappeared into thin air!

The ghost of Simon of Sudbury is also said to haunt St Gregory’s Church in Sudbury, Suffolk.

As this is where his severed skull is kept!

 

Geoffrey House, Canterbury

Along St Margaret’s Street in Canterbury you’ll come across a building which now houses a tea rooms.

The historic building is known as Geoffrey House and dates back to the 1600’s.

It was first constructed by Sir Geoffrey Newman and was kept in the Newman family up until 1957.

In the 1980s Geoffrey House was leased to a Chinese restaurant but a devastating fire broke out and destroyed a lot of the building.

During the restoration work on the building, workmen discovered children artefacts behind the panelling of a room that’s now called ‘The Ghost Room’.

They found inscriptions for the past generations of Newman children who had lived and died in the house.

Collections of children’s teeth together with a ringlet of hair and the name, date of birth and date of death for each child were found behind ‘linen fold’ panelling,

Hidden in the fireplace were bags of salt in Hessian and a collection of 16th century children’s shoes.

It seems like the discovery and removal of the children’s artefacts have stirred up some paranormal activity within the Geoffrey House.

The tea rooms members of staff and guests alike have reported seeing apparitions of children and hearing them throughout the building.

Strange noises from the attic, sudden temperature drops and the sound of phantom children playing on the stairs, whispering and singing have all been reported by spooked witnesses.

The phantom children have also been blamed for hiding and moving objects around the building and turning taps on and off!

 

Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury

Canterbury Cathedral was first founded in 597 but was totally destroyed by fire in 1067.

It was then rebuilt under the first Norman archbishop, Lanfranc between 1070 and 1077.

The ancient cathedral has a reputation for being haunted by phantom monks.

The cloisters is the area where most of the ghostly monks are witnessed…

A cathedral security guard had an eerie experience one night in the cloisters when he came across what he thought were a bunch of schoolboys dressed up as monks.

He asked them what they were doing there and at first they didn’t reply.

Eventually they told him ‘We are to the Scriptorium!’

Satisfied with their reply the security guard carried on with his rounds.

Later he saw his supervisor and told him about his encounter with the schoolboy monks.

His boss was shocked as all the schoolboys should’ve been in bed at that time of night.

And the Scriptorium had actually burnt to the ground in 1100 resulting in the deaths of eighty monks!

The security guard isn’t the only person to have seen ghostly monks in the cloisters…

Many people have witnessed them including the prize-winning novelist Rhona Martin.

She once attended the choir school at the cathedral.

And one day she was walking through the cloisters when a monk with his head bowed in prayer walked pass her.

As he passed her she noticed the atmosphere suddenly drop in temperature.

And then she witnessed the very lifelike monk just totally vanished into thin air!

 

Millers Field Car Park, Canterbury

Just along the Causeway in the city you’ll find Millers Field Car Park.

As the name suggests it hasn’t always been a car park.

Up until 1936 it was a field which was used by a nearby flour mill to store its goods ready for transportation via the river.

Spooked local residents have reported seeing a ghostly apparition of a man wandering around the area in the early hours of the morning.

They describe the ghostly man as being dressed in a white smock and a flat grey cap.

In other words… the uniform of a miller from bygone years!

 

St Radigunds Street Church, Canterbury

On St Radigunds Street in Canterbury you’ll find a rather plain looking square towered church next to the Parrot pub.

In the 1970’s this building was undergoing some restoration work.

A plumber was working alone one night in the church when he suddenly heard the front door slam shut.

He stopped his work and went to see who’d entered the building.

When he reached the front door he was surprised to find it firmly shut and nobody had entered the church.

Just then, the door of the room he’d been working in slammed shut behind him.

He turned around to witness through the frosted glass of the door a ghostly figure heading towards the sink area where he’d been working.

This was all too much for the poor plumber and he fled the building.

The next day the plumber returned to the church to find his tool bag had been moved into the main area of the church and his hammer was standing on its head by the front door as though someone had placed it there.

Apparently, other workmen reported having similar ghostly experiences to the plumber’s whilst they worked alone in the church!

 

Sir John Boys House, Canterbury

On the corner of Palace Street and King Street you’ll find an old crooked house called Sir John Boys House.

The attractive half-timbered building dates back to the 17th century.

It’s named after Sir John Boys who was an MP and the first recorder of Canterbury.

The house has a ghostly tale associated with it…

In the winter of 1987 it was being used as a shop.

One late afternoon staff members heard phantom footsteps walking around an upstairs stock room.

This was strange because it would’ve been difficult for a person to move around the room as it was jammed packed full of clothes.

One of the staff members went to investigate but only found that the room was freezing cold.

Feeling rather unnerved she left the room but returned to investigated it the next morning.

This time when she entered the room she felt the suddenly temperature drop and feeling unnerved again decided to leave.

As she turned around to leave she was shocked to see an apparition of a woman standing a couple of feet away from her.

Apparently the woman was wearing a rather fine period style red silk dress with a wide collar and fur cuffs!

The ghostly woman stood staring at her for a while then she turned around and descended the stairs disappearing into thin air as she reached halfway down them.

 

Flemish House, Canterbury

At one end of Canterbury’s Palace Street you’ll find an old timbered house which is now the premises of an upmarket kitchen shop.

The building is called the Flemish House.

The ancient house is rumoured to be haunted…

One of the former shop owners reported on many occasions smelling pipe tobacco smoke when he climbed the stairs to go to the first floor of the building.

Other witnesses have also reported being shoved aside by unseen hands whilst they were on the stairs!

Many years ago a workman working at the property placed his saw on the windowsill of the front window facing the street.

When he turned his back, the saw totally disappeared from sight.

The workman thought it had dropped down on the busy street outside so search both outside the building and inside thoroughly but never found it.

Three months later the gardener was uprooting an old tree stump in the back garden when he discovered the workman’s saw deeply embedded in it.

How it got there, nobody knows!

Although all this strange activity has been reported to take place in the old Flemish House, an apparition has never been seen within the building.

 

The Archbishop’s Old Palace, Canterbury

Along Palace Street in Canterbury you’ll find a large flint and stone building which is known as the Archbishop’s Old Palace.

The Grade I listed building is believed to be one of the places where the knights Reginald FitzUrse, Hugh de Moreville, William de Tracy and Richard le Breton met in 1170 before they went off to murder Thomas à Becket in Canterbury Cathedral.

It’s said that on the anniversary of the murder of Thomas à Becket the ghost of Reginald FitzUrse appears in the hall of the Old Palace.

A couple of years ago a security guard was in the process of locking the doors of the hall for the night when he suddenly witnessed the apparition of a medieval knight.

Apparently the ghostly knight was wearing a knight’s tabard and carrying a large sword.

The apparition ran towards the street entrance of the Old Palace and disappeared into the night!

 

St Alphaege’s Cottage, Canterbury

Along Palace Street in Canterbury there’s a rather attractive timber framed house called St Alphaege’s Cottage.

The Grade II* listed building dates back to the medieval era.

And it has a reputation for being haunted by a ghostly old priest.

Witnesses tend to see his ghostly apparition standing in the doorway of the main front bedroom looking towards the bedroom’s window.

The old priest ghost is said to be unaware of his surroundings and doesn’t try to communicate with anybody.

Apparently he hasn’t been seen at the property for many years, whether he still haunts it I’ll let you decide!

 

Queen Elizabeth’s Guest Chamber, Canterbury

Along Canterbury’s High Street you’ll find a coffee shop situated in a Grade II* listed Elizabethan building.

The historic building is the Queen Elizabeth’s Guest Chamber and it dates back to the late 16th century.

Elizabeth I entertained the Duc d’Alencon here in 1573 when the building was the Crown Inn.

The cellars of the old inn once held prisoners from the Napoleonic wars.

With such a long and eventful history you probably won’t be too surprised to discover that the building has a reputation for being haunted.

When the building was being converted into the present coffee shop, workmen turning up for work in the mornings found artefacts had been left for them by someone unknown.

On different occasions they found left on the old staircase a 16th century child’s shoe and 13th century silver coins!

Staff members at the coffee shop have reported feeling sudden temperature drops throughout the building.

And passers-by have reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a little child tapping on the middle window overlooking the street.

 

The Old Buttermarket, Canterbury

Overlooking the Butter Market square in Canterbury there’s a Georgian looking pub called the Old Buttermarket.

The Grade II listed building is older than it looks.

It’s said to date back to the medieval times when it was part of an inn called the White Bull.

Like a lot of old pubs in Canterbury it has a cellar which at one time was connected by a passageway to Canterbury Cathedral.

The Old Buttermarket’s cellar is reputed to be haunted by the ghost of an angry Guardian Monk!

During an investigation into the attic spaces of the Old Buttermarket and its neighbouring buildings a woman’s skeleton was discovered tied to the crown post.

Her death looked suspicious and from the remains of her clothing it’s believed she was a nun.

Spooked members of staff have reported that a female spirit would throw objects around them whilst they worked in the kitchen!

 

The Cheery Tree, Canterbury

You’ll find the Cheery Tree pub along Whitehorse Lane in Canterbury.

In the 1920s a terrible fire burnt down the White Horse Hotel and the Fleur de Lys Hotel in the lane.

Twelve people died in the fire and it’s said that some of their spirits haunt the Cherry Tree pub today.

A young chambermaid died in the fire when the roof collapsed killing her instantly.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen looking forlorn standing outside the Cherry Tree pub.

In 2005 three local students witnessed the ghostly little girl walking by the entrance of the then County Hotel car park heading along Whitehorse Lane towards the Salvation Army Hall.

Apparently she had her head bowed with her hands by her sides and she had a silvery glow to her!

 

Canterbury Castle, Canterbury

At the end of Castle Street in Canterbury you’ll find Canterbury Castle.

Together with Dover and Rochester castles, Canterbury Castle was one of the original Royal castles of Kent.

It was first built as a wooden motte and bailey castle in 1070.

The stone keep you see today was later constructed in the reign of Henry I.

In the 13th century the castle was used as a local prison.

And in the 17th century it withstood two sieges by Cromwellian troops during the English Civil War.

By the 19th century the castle had fell into disrepair and was being used by a gas company for storage.

It’s now owned by the local authority and is open to the public if you fancy having a look around.

The castle has a reputation for being haunted…

Late night passers-by have reported seeing the ghostly apparitions of guards from a bygone era patrolling the perimeter wall of the castle!

 

White Hart Inn, Canterbury

In Canterbury’s Worthgate Place you’ll find a historic inn called the White Hart.

The pub was built on the site of the ruined St Mary’s church.

Next to the pub is a small park which was once the church’s graveyard.

And the pub’s cellar was once the mortuary to the church and still has a body chute!

During the English Civil War it’s said that many bodies were dumped in the cellar.

And a boy working in the cellar was killed after being buried alive with bodies that were thrown down the chute!

It’s now said that the ghost of that poor young boy haunts the cellar of the pub to this very day.

 

Cogan House, Canterbury

You’ll find the Grade II* listed Cogan House located along St Peter’s Street in Canterbury.

Today the building has a 19th century façade to it and houses an Italian restaurant.

But you may be surprised to discover that the building is older than it looks and that it actually dates back to the late 12th century.

The building was originally called Cockyns Hospital after William Cockyn.

And it later changed its name to Cogans Hospital after John Cogan.

He owned the house from 1626 to 1657 and left it to be founded as a hospital after his death.

The building is said to be haunted…

Whilst John Cogan lived at the house he reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a figure in Elizabethan clothing in the upper back room which overlooks the garden.

Cogan also reported being woken up in the night by the ghost of a former owner of the house called Ralph Bawden.

He said that Ralph’s ghost was standing at the foot of his bed with his hands clasped together as in pray!

The ghost of John Bygg who was the former owner of the old King’s Mill in the 14th century has also been seen standing at the top the stairs.

At the end of the garden which was once part of the school playground are some benches.

Many children have reported chatting to an apparition of a friendly old man who sits on the benches.

It seems like this old man’s ghost only appears to children as no adult has reported seeing him.

A lot of witnesses who’ve seen paranormal activity within the building have also reported feeling a strong gust of wind followed by the odour of rotting fish!

 

Eastbridge Hospital of St Thomas the Martyr, Canterbury

You’ll find the Grade I listed Eastbridge Hospital of St Thomas the Martyr along the High Street in Canterbury.

The historic hospital was founded in 1190 by Edward FitzOdbold to provide accommodation for pilgrims visiting the shrine of St Thomas Beckett.

Today it’s one of the ten almshouses which still provide accommodation for the elderly of Canterbury.

The building is said to have been haunted for well over four hundred years by the ghost of a monk.

The funny thing is that he only shows himself to residents of the hospital!

He’s often seen at dusk in the months of October and November.

Witnesses describe his ghostly apparition as being hooded and praying.

Another apparition seen at the hospital by spooked visitors to the building is that of a phantom white dog.

He’s been witnessed standing by the stairs to the upper chamber.

 

60th Rifles Memorial to Indian Mutiny, Dover

If you head along Camden Crescent in Dover you’ll come across a Grade II listed war memorial.

The Classical style granite and bronze 60th Rifles Memorial to Indian Mutiny was erected by the First Battalion of the Royal Rifles in August 1861 in memory of their fallen comrades of the Indian campaigns of 1857 (Oudh), 1858 (Delhi) and 1859 (Rohilkhand).

The monument is said to be guarded by the ghosts of four young riflemen officers…

Witnesses have described the ghostly riflemen as wearing full dress uniforms from the 1850s era.

Apparently they stand with their heads bowed with their hands on their rifle butts until they’re approached and then they suddenly take up an attack position.

Many a late night reveller has been scared witless after making the mistake of approaching the ghostly soldiers!

It’s said that when the monument was built there was some controversy about it and it was ordered to be pulled down by the Government for diplomatic reasons.

The Dover Corporation responded by building cast iron railings around it to stop any demolition attempt.

It’s thought the cast iron railings were removed in the 1940s as part of the war effort but it now looks like the ghosts of former riflemen are there today to protect the monument!

 

Market Square, Dover

Dover’s Market Square plus the huge stone building which now houses a high street bank on Cannon Street are said to be haunted by the ghost of a headless man.

The ghost is believed to the spirit of William de Pole.

He was the 1st Duke of Suffolk, Lord High Admiral of England from 1447 until 1450 and a commander during the Hundred Years’ War.

He was blamed for the losses of English possessions in northern France and banished from England for five years.

During his banishment voyage to Calais in 1450 his ship was intercepted.

He was captured, put through a mock trial and then beheaded!

His headless body was later discovered on a Dover beach but his decapitated head was never found.

Legend says that his head was put in a chalk receptacle and hidden in St Peter’s Church in Dover.

Before St Peter’s Church was demolished it was located on the north side of Market Square.

In 1810 parts of the buildings that were built on the demolished church site were themselves pulled down.

During this time the old foundations of the church were found and a chalk cask containing a man’s skull was discovered!

Many believed that the skull was that of William de Pole.

Terrified witnesses who’ve seen the ghostly apparition of the headless William de Pole describe him as being dressed in medieval clothing.

Many believe that his ghost is still looking for his decapitated head to this very day!

 

Dover Castle, Dover

Situated on Dover’s Castle Hill you’ll find Dover Castle the largest castle in England.

Dover Castle is a Scheduled Monument and Grade I listed building.

It dates back to the 1180s when it was first built by King Henry II on the site of an ancient Iron Age hillfort.

The castle held off an attack by rebel barons in 1216 and managed to come through the English Civil War unscathed.

During the Napoleonic Wars at the end of the 18th century Dover Castle underwent massive changes to its defences.

A network of tunnels was dug into the cliff face for use as barracks for two thousand men and for storage of their equipment.

During the Second World War the tunnels were used as a military command centre, an underground hospital and an air raid shelter.

Later, during the Cold War, the tunnels were transformed into a shelter for the Regional Seats of Government in the event of a nuclear attack.

With such a long and eventful history it’s no wonder that Dover Castle has gain a reputation for being one of the most haunted places in the UK.

In fact, the gang from the popular paranormal TV series Most Haunted conducted a live investigation at the castle in December 2002!

 

The Drop Redoubt, Dover

The Drop Redoubt is one of two 19th century forts located on Dover’s Western Heights.

The fort was first constructed in 1804 during the Napoleonic Wars to protect Dover from an attack from the rear.

The original Drop Redoubt was a simple pentagon shape fort which could house two hundred troops.

Later in 1859 the fort’s defences were further improved following the recommendations of the Royal Commission.

During the Second World War the Redoubt housed a secret squad of commandos whose sole job was to destroy Dover Harbour if it fell into the enemy’s hands!

Like a lot of old 19th century forts up and down the country the Drop Redoubt has a reputation for being haunted…

One of the jobs of a young drummer boy who was stationed at the Western Heights garrison was to help the Quartermaster in his duties.

One day the Quartermaster asked the drummer boy to help him carry the troops pay from the bank to the garrison.

To get the money back from the bank they had to take the segregated staircase of the Grand Shaft.

The Quartermaster gave the lighter bag of notes to the drummer boy to carry whilst he himself took the heavier bags of silver and gold coins.

The drummer boy took the Grand Shaft’s staircase designated for privates whilst the Quartermaster took the sergeant’s staircase.

The boy being younger and having a lighter load to carry reached the top of the staircase first and the Quartermaster shouted out to him to wait for him.

When the Quartermaster reached the top of the staircase the boy had totally disappeared.

The drummer boy couldn’t found anywhere and the Quartermaster eventually raised the alarm thinking that the boy had stolen the money.

The next morning a search party found the headless body of the boy under the Drop Redoubt’s ramparts.

He had been murdered and the garrison pay was stolen!

Today the ghost of the drummer boy is said to haunt both the Drop Redoubt fort and the nearby Dover Castle.

The sound of his phantom drumming has been heard by spooked visitors in both locations.

And terrified witnesses have reported seeing his ghostly apparition patrolling the battlements of both buildings.

The murderer of the drummer boy was never found!

 

The Eight Bells, Dover

Along Dover’s Cannon Street, just opposite St Mary’s parish church, you’ll find the Eight Bells pub.

The pub resides in part of the former historic Metropole Hotel.

The Metropole was a luxury hotel which opened in 1896 when Dover was one of the wealthiest towns in the UK.

When the converted flats above the Eight Bells pub were empty, passers-by reported hearing the sounds of a woman singing coming from them.

It’s believed that the phantom singing was coming from the ghost of a young lady called Adele.

Adele was a beautiful blonde who was always happy and loved to sing.

She would meet up with her lover at the Metropole Hotel on a regular basis.

When the First World War came along her lover joined the Royal Flying Corps, stopped seeing Adele and married his fiancée.

Adele volunteered as a nurse and left to care for the wounded soldiers on the front line.

She was later killed whilst at the front in Belgium but it’s said that her ghost returned to her much loved Metropole Hotel.

In fact, her former best friend who was a housekeeper at the Metropole once saw her ghost in a room at the hotel.

She rushed towards her and gave her a hug at which time Adele disappeared into thin air!

 

Dover College, Dover

Along Dover’s Effingham Street you’ll find Dover College.

Dover College is a private school which was found in 1871 in the old medieval buildings of Dover Priory.

Between 1536 and 1541 a lot of Dover Priory was ransacked by King Henry VIII as part of his dissolution of the monasteries.

The area between the listed 12th century Refectory and Gatehouse is said to be haunted by the ghost of Geoffrey Plantagenet, Archbishop of York.

His ghostly apparition is said to appear on stormy nights!

Witnesses have also reported hearing phantom singing in the area where the old priory chapel once stood!

 

Maison Dieu House, Dover

You’ll find the historic Maison Dieu House along Dover’s Biggin Street.

The red brick grade II* listed building dates back to 1665 when it was first built by the Royal Navy for the Agent Victualler.

In 2007 Dover Council called in a local paranormal investigation team to conduct a vigil in the building after spooked council workers reported strange events taking place within the Maison Dieu House.

Clocks mysteriously chiming, doorbells ringing for no apparent reason, pictures suddenly falling of walls, doors slamming shut on their own accord and sudden temperature drops were the most common events reported to take place within the building.

Local legend says that the building is haunted by the ghost of a former nanny called Mary Gray who was shot dead during the revolution of 1688.

The 2007 investigation concluded that the building was haunted by many ghosts with the most prominent one being that of Mary Gray!

 

Buckland House, Dover

Along Crabble Hill in Dover you’ll find the Grade II listed Buckland House.

The house was built in 1823 by Thomas Horn who was the owner of the nearby Buckland Paper Mill.

Buckland House is said to be haunted by the ghost of a little boy called Jack.

Spooked witnesses have reported hearing him singing and on some occasion have actually seen his ghostly apparition.

Recently the house was left empty for a long time but the caretaker of the building reported that he would often hear Jack singing.

On a couple of occasion he actually saw his ghostly apparition coming down the stairs.

Apparently he was wearing an 19th century style blue suit!

 

Castlemount, Dover

Castlemount was once a purpose built upper class preparatory boy’s school in Dover.

It was built in 1876 and was located to the east side of the Dour Valley in the town.

In 1911 French monks called Les Freres des Ecoles Christiennes took over Castlemount and established a training centre for teachers there.

From this time onwards Castlemount started to get a reputation for being haunted by a ghost called the Black Monk!

In 1948 the building became one of Dover’s mixed secondary modern schools.

But in 1973 arsons set fire to the school and sadly most of main building was reduced to a blackened shell.

A new school was built in its place but that was later closed and then demolished.

The Castlemount site was then redeveloped with houses.

Now you may think that with the destruction of the school buildings the sightings of the Black Monk would have ceased.

But that’s not the case…

To this present day spooked witnesses are still reporting seeing his ghostly apparition within the Castlemount area!

 

White Horse Inn, Dover

At the bottom of Dover’s Castle Hill Road next to the ruins of St James Church you’ll find the historic White Horse Inn.

The Grade II listed pub is said to be the oldest in the town with the original building dating back to 1365!

It was first built as a dwelling for the Churchwarden of St James Church.

But later became the home of Dover’s “ale taster”.

And then in the mid-17th century it became a pub called the City of Edinburgh which was named after an American ship that sank in the Dover Straits.

That pub changed it’s named to the White Horse in 1818.

In the 19th century the White Horse was said to have the coldest cellar in Dover.

And for this reason dead bodies were kept in the cellar during the summer months.

The White Horse is said to have its own resident ghost called George.

Many believe that George is the spirit of a mariner who sadly drowned at sea.

His body is said to have been kept in the cellar of the White Horse until its burial.

George’s ghostly apparition has been witnessed many times by both members of staff and guests alike.

Local legend says that he’d even served customers on a few occasions!

 

Coining House Cave, Samphire Hoe

Two miles to the west of Dover is the Samphire Hoe Country Park which was created in 1994 from the Channel Tunnel spoil.

In the cliff face overlooking Samphire Hoe there’s a cave called Coining House.

Coining House was cut into the cliff face by smugglers to hide their illicit goods.

The cave is said to be haunted by a male ghost who calls out for Susanne.

The ghost is believed to be the spirit of a man called Richard Carter.

Richard was an informer and came to Dover in 1669 to investigate the local smuggling gangs.

Upon arriving in the town he was befriended by a beautiful local woman called Susanne.

Susanne was actually part of the local smuggling gang.

When Richard discovered the Coining House cave, Suzanne together with men from her gang killed Richard by throwing him off the cliff above the cave!

His ghost is now said to haunt the cave calling out for the beautiful Susanne.

Terrified witnesses have also reported seeing the ghostly apparition of a white figure which runs across the Hoe into the cliff face.

Witnesses who it passes say that the air turns freezing cold as the ghostly figure runs pass!

Spooked volunteers who work at Samphire Hoe have also reported hearing phantom feet marching across the Hoe.

They believe the ghostly footsteps are created by the perished former workers of the original 19th century Channel Tunnel and the Shakespeare Colliery!

 

Temple Ewell

You’ll find the historic village of Temple Ewell about three miles to the north west of the town of Dover.

The village dates back to the 8th century and was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086.

The name Ewell is derived from Old English meaning river source or spring.

And the prefix of Temple indicates that the village was owned by the Knights Templar from 1163 to 1314.

Surrounding the village is a number of steep hills.

One of those hills is called Ghost Hill because the ghostly apparitions of a handsome young man on horseback and a woman are often witnessed there.

The young man is said to be the ghost of Tom who died in 1777 after delivering an important letter to London concerning the French support of the American colonies.

The woman is said to be his beloved Elizabeth.

She is said to have been thrown from a horse and injured whilst helping Tom deliver the letter after he was drugged by French spies.

The couple were separated when Tom delivered the letter to London at a later date but sadly collapse and died from the effects of the drugging.

Elizabeth survived the ordeal and lived until her fifties.

But Tom thought Elizabeth died when she was thrown from her horse and Elizabeth never knew Tom died in London after he delivered the letter.

It’s now said that both their ghosts are looking for each other on the hills overlooking the village of Temple Ewell!

 

Waldershare Park, Waldershare

The areas of Waldershare Park and Malmain’s Wood are said to be haunted by the ghost of William de Malmain.

His ghostly apparition is said to be wandering the area on horseback looking for a woman he wronged.

One cold winter’s afternoon whilst out riding he’d come across a woman who’d been attacked.

She begged him for help to find her little daughter who’d ran off into the woods whilst she was being attacked.

William de Malmain ignored the woman’s pleas and rode off home.

Later the woman came across some workmen who were constructing William de Malmain new mansion.

She begged them for help to look for her daughter but when they ask Malmain for permission to do so he instead had them lock her up overnight for trespass.

In the morning when they unlocked the woman’s prison she managed to escape and ran off into the woods.

Later she returned with the body of her little girl who’d frozen to death in the woods during the night.

She saw William de Malmain and casted a curse on him that any of his children would succumb to the same fate as her child.

The woman then walked off into the woods and was never seen again.

Malmain returned home to find that his young daughter had suddenly been taken ill.

A couple weeks later she died from her illness!

It’s said that the remorseful William spent his remaining days looking for the woman to beg her forgiveness.

And now his ghost is wandering the areas of Waldershare Park and Malmain’s Wood still looking for her!

 

Farthingloe Valley, Dover

To the west of Dover you’ll find a long valley called Farthingloe.

Local legend says the valley was the home of the beautiful Lady of Farthingloe in the 5th and 6th century.

It’s said that fate was cruel to the lady as she became ill probably from smallpox which resulted in her face becoming disfigured.

The ghost of Lady Farthingloe is often seen walking in the area of Dover’s Folkestone Road.

Spooked witnessed have described her as wearing a hooded cloak with a long grey dress and having her face hidden by a light gauze veil!

In fact, during the 1990s when the Channel Tunnel was being constructed, her ghostly apparition was often seen by the Channel Tunnel workmen who lived in the worker’s camp situated in the Farthingloe Valley.

 

Marine Station, Dover

Today Dover’s Grade II Marine Station has been transformed into the Port of Dover state-of-the-art Cruise Terminal 1 building.

Marine Station dates back to 1914 and is said to be haunted by the ghost of a British soldier from the Great War called Jimmy.

Before the war Jimmy worked for the South Eastern & Chatham Railway Company but joined the British Army when the First World War began.

Sadly he was killed in action during the Battle of the Somme in 1916.

Jimmy’s ghost started to appear in the station from this time onwards.

He’s often seen standing next to the station’s Railway Workers’ Memorial.

Witnesses describe him as wearing an old tatty soldier’s uniform from the First World War period!

 

Radio Caroline

Radio Caroline was an unlicensed pirate radio station founded by Ronan O’Rahilly in 1964.

From 1964 to 1990 it broadcasted from international waters using five different ships.

The MV Ross Revenge was a former North Sea factory fishing trawler that the radio station used from 1983 onwards.

The ship had a reputation for being haunted by the ghost of a fisherman nicknamed Sailor Sam.

His phantom footsteps were often heard walking around the ship by those on board.

But Sailor Sam’s apparition was also seen on many occasions…

In 1987 the DJ Nigel Harris witnessed him pointing to the mast.

The very next day the mast fell into the sea during a terrible storm!

Witnesses described Sailor Sam’s apparition as wearing oilskins with a sou’wester.

It’s believed that Sam is either the ghost of a sailor who died in a fire on board the ship or a sailor who drowned after being caught up in fishing nets and pulled into the sea!

Sam’s ghost was often seen in the toilet and in the galley areas of the ship.

Although it may sounds spooky to share the confined space of a ship with a ghost, most of the crew actually though Sam was harmless!

 

Cleve Court, Acol

Along the Minister Road between the Kent hamlet of Acol and the village of Minister-in-Thanet you’ll find a stunning Georgian house called Cleve Court.

The Grade II* listed property dates back to 1730 and is said to be haunted by a Grey Lady ghost.

The Grey Lady is believed to be the ghost of Josiah Farrrer’s wife.

Josiah Farrrer was the High Sheriff of Kent in the 18th century.

He inherited Cleve Court together with a small fortune in 1762 at the young age of twenty three.

This resulted in Josiah living an extravagant lifestyle, locking his wife up out of the way so that he could party away without hindrance.

Due to this bad treatment by her husband, his wife became depressed and later died.

Her ghost is now said to haunt Cleve Court.

Phantom footsteps are often heard walking around the property.

Spooked witnesses who’ve seen the Grey Lady describe her as wearing an old-fashioned dress with a grey cape and a white ribbon in her hair.

She’s often seen by the children of the house as it’s believed that she was very fond of them.

Past residents of Cleve Court have come to the conclusion that the Grey Lady is a harmless ghost!

 

Chiddingstone Castle, Chiddingstone

You’ll find Chiddingstone Castle in the Kent village of Chiddingstone which is located near to the town of Edenbridge.

The Grade II* listed castle you see today dates back to the early 19th century but sits on the site of a 16th century timber-framed castle.

The castle was the seat of the Streatfeild family from the early 16th century to the early 19th century after it was built for the local iron master and wool merchant Richard Streatfeild.

The castle has a reputation for being haunted…

The little lane which leads up to the castle is said to be haunted by the ghost of Anne who was the daughter of the Earl of Leicester.

She married into the Streatfeild family in the 1700s and was very fond of the castle.

Witnesses describe Anne’s apparition as wearing a tricorn hat and riding habit whilst happily riding her beloved horse along the lane!

Another more famous Anne is also said to haunt the castle grounds…

The ghostly apparition of Anne Boleyn the second wife of King Henry VIII has been seen on the little bridge which crosses the River Eden in the castle grounds and also under the great oak where it’s said Henry courted her!

Anne Boleyn normally appears in the castle ground over the Christmas period.

Anne had connections with Chiddingstone as her father bought property in the village during the early 1500s.

 

The Shipwrights Arms, Hollowshore

You’ll find the white timber-framed Shipwrights Arms at Hollowshore, Faversham.

The pub is located on a creek which runs into the River Swale.

The present day Shipwrights Arms dates back to the 17th century but there’s evidence that an earlier building was on the site since the 13th century!

Over the centuries the pub was a favourite with the local fishermen, sailors, smugglers and pirates.

The pub and the adjacent boatyard is said to be haunted by the ghost of a Spanish sailor who leaves a rather rancid smell in the air when his spirit is present.

Legend says that one stormy night in the 1700s a Spanish gallon sunk in the River Swale and the only survivor was the ship’s captain.

He made it onshore and staggered to the Shipwrights Arms for help.

The landlord at the time thought he was another drunken sailor trying to get a drink after hours so just ignored the Spaniard’s pleas for help.

The Spaniard’s dead body was found the next morning outside the pub!

Witnesses who’ve seen the ghostly Spaniard describe him as wearing black and having a haunted look about him.

His ghost has been blamed not only for the bad rancid smell but for causing sudden temperature drops and moving items around the pub.

 

Pennis Lane, Fawkham Green

Pennis Lane in the Kent village of Fawkham Green is said to be haunted by the ghost of a nun who was sexually attacked by a group of men.

She gave up a strong fight but sadly died during the attack.

Spooked witnesses have reported hearing phantom screams and the sound of horse’s hooves galloping away along Pennis Lane in the middle of the night!

The nun’s skull is said to be stored in the attic of a nearby house.

Legend says that anyone who removes it will fall to ill luck.

In fact, concerned villagers wanted to give the nun’s skull a Christian burial and buried in the local churchyard.

Soon afterwards, it’s said that ghostly disturbances took place within the village.

The paranormal activity was so much that the villagers decided to dig up the skull and return it to the attic where it’s said to remain today!

 

Leas Pavilion Theatre, Folkestone

You’ll find the Edwardian Leas Pavilion Theatre situated along the Leas in Folkestone.

At the moment the Grade II listed building hasn’t been used since 2007 and is sadly in need of some loving care.

The building was built in 1902 and was used as a theatre up until 1984.

The theatre had a reputation for being haunted by the ghost of a former elderly caretaker who tragically committed suicide in the building by hanging himself.

It’s said that the old man was lonely and had serious debt problems due to his gambling habits.

Spooked staff members often reported feeling his presence within the theatre especially in the dressing room which is located near to where he committed suicide.

Doors had been reported to open and close on their own accord.

And members of staff reported that equipment would be mysteriously moved to its right location just before performances as if the old man’s ghost was trying to help them out!

 

Joanna Lumley’s House, Goodnestone

In the late 1980s the actress Joanna Lumley and her conductor husband Stephen Barlow bought an old parsonage in the Kent village of Goodnestone.

The Grade II listed building dated back to the late 17th century.

Funnily enough it was the birth place of the famous ghost writer M.R. James who was born in the house in 1862.

Joanna’s paranormal activity at the parsonage started the very first day she moved into the house.

Whilst she was down in the cellar, a man who she thought was one of the removal guys came very close to her face and said ‘Leave this place’.

He then left the cellar and headed for the removal lorry.

Angered by his confrontation she decided to report him to his boss but when she got to the removal lorry she couldn’t see him anywhere!

She described the hostile man as being dressed in a flat cap and an old style leather jerkin.

Joanna later discovered that a secret tunnel lead from the house’s cellar to the local graveyard!

Lights turning themselves on and off by their own accord, sudden temperature drops, phantom footsteps and object disappearing or being moved from one room to another were just some of the paranormal activity reported to take place within the house.

On one occasion a fresh grave was dug by the tennis court by someone unknown but then totally disappeared during the night!

Three years pasted and Joanna and her husband decided to sell the house.

On the moving day she went down to the cellar and announced to the ghost that she was leaving the house…

At that moment she smelt the strong perfume of many roses!

The strange thing about the house today, is that the new owners have never reported any paranormal activity taking place with their home.

 

Heritage House, Gravesend

You’ll find the Grade II listed Heritage House within Gravesend’s Heritage Quarter at the northern end of the High Street.

The three storeys weather-boarded building dates back to the mid-18th century.

Today it houses business offices but has gain a reputation for being haunted.

You see, in the 1990s members of staff working in Heritage House reported strange things happening within the building.

Sudden temperature drops, objects being mysteriously moved, the lights and kettle turning themselves on and off by their own accord, strange symbols appearing on computer screens as well as the dates being altered, phantom smells of bacon and bread cooking, a cheque went missing and was later found in the garden under some leaves and someone was heard typing in an empty office room.

These were all the strange paranormal activities which the spooked staff members reported taking place within the building.

Some of the staff members believed the ghostly goings-on were caused by the spirit of the Native American Gravesend’s heroine, Pocahontas!

 

Ramhurst Manor, Leigh

Just off Powder Mill Lane to the east of the village you’ll find Ramhurst Manor House.

The Grade II* listed building dates back to the 16th century.

For many generations the manor was owned by the famous Kent Culpepper family.

In 1857 the house was occupied by the family and wife of a high ranking English officer.

The spooked wife reported hearing strange knocking noises, phantom footsteps and an eerie voice sometimes talking, sometimes reading out aloud and sometimes screaming!

One of the servants reported she heard a silk dress rustling behind her one day, thinking it was her mistress she turned around to discover nobody there.

One night the wife’s brother was staying at the house and in the early hours of the morning he was awoken by two women talking in his sister’s room.

Suddenly the chatting turned into a scream and he rushed into her room armed with a gun to protect his sister from her attacker.

All he found was his sister fast asleep!

A friend of the family who came to stay witnessed a ghostly elderly couple dressed in clothing from a bygone age standing at the front door when she arrived at the manor house.

During her stay at the house she went on to see the ghostly couple many times.

One time the elderly couple actually spoke to her saying they once owned the house and were from the Children family.

Richard Children did indeed buy the house in 1753 and died at the age of 83 passing the house onto his eldest son John Children.

Since the English officer’s family left the manor house no subsequent owner has ever reported any ghostly goings-on in the building!

 

Leigh Railway, Leigh

In the 1800s there was a tragic accident when a goods train derailed and plunged into a nearby gravel pit.

Two railwaymen drowned in the gravel pit and it’s now said that the ghost on one of those men has been seen walking along the side of the railway track.

In the 1970s a 19 year old local girl sadly killed herself by jumping in front of train.

In 1976, fishermen saw her ghostly apparition dressed in red standing on the railway embankment before disappearing into thin air!

 

Lympne Castle, Lympne

You’ll find the Kent village of Lympne to the west of Folkestone near to the Romney Marsh.

Along Castle Close on the south side of the village you’ll find the medieval Lympne Castle.

Today the privately owned Grade I listed castle is primarily used as a venue for corporate events and weddings.

The castle has a couple of ghostly tales to tell…

During the Norman era, six Saxon priests hid in the castle.

Unfortunately they were found by Norman soldiers who hacked then to death.

It’s now said that their ghosts haunt the inner sanctum of the castle causing the feeling of despair and fear.

During the Roman occupation of Britain there was a Roman fortress on the site of Lympne Castle.

Local legend says that a Roman sentry fell to his death whilst on duty in the watch tower.

His ghost is now said to also haunt the castle.

His phantom footsteps have been heard by terrified witnesses patrolling the castle.

In days gone by his ghostly apparition was once a common sight at the castle but recently his ghost hasn’t been seen for a while.

Ghostly apparitions from the Tudor period have also been seen wandering the castle and its grounds.

 

Holy Trinity Church, Maidstone

Along Church Street in Maidstone you’ll find an impressive looking Victorian church which was once the Holy Trinity Church.

The Holy Trinity was declared redundant in the late 1960s with the building being converted into office accommodation called Trinity Foyer.

The churchyard was partially cleared and turned into Trinity Park.

In the 1970s a young woman was walking her dog through the disused churchyard when she suddenly saw the apparitions of three young women dressed in Victorian clothing floating across the churchyard.

They headed towards the edge of the churchyard where they disappeared into thin air.

The young woman headed to the spot where the Victorian women disappeared and found a large flat memorial stone in the ground.

The inscription on the stone told the sad story of a Victorian vicar whose three daughters had all died in the same week of scarlet fever!

Apparently the ghostly Victorian women make an appearance every year in the month of July.

 

Theatre Royal Margate

Along Margate’s Addington Street you’ll find the Grade II listed Theatre Royal Margate.

The Georgian theatre dates back to 1787.

In its time the building has been used as a furniture store, a cinema and a bingo hall.

Today it’s been reverted to its intended use and is used as a theatre.

Like a lot of old theatres up and down the country, the Theatre Royal Margate has a reputation for being haunted.

It’s said to be haunted by the ghost of Sarah Thorne who was a Victorian actress and former manager of the theatre.

Her ghost tends to appear when the building in going through change.

She was very active during the time the theatre was used as a furniture store.

Her ghostly apparition was seen on many occassions in the stage area and in one of the boxes.

Witnesses described her as wearing a beautiful Victorian crinoline dress and bonnet.

The theatre is also said to be haunted by another ghost of an actor.

It’s said that an actor from another theatre was fired from his acting role.

Apparently he then bought a box at the Royal and during a performance leaped from it killing himself in the process!

From then on his ghost haunted the box making it impossible to hire out to theatre goers.

Eventually the box was bricked up and never used again.

During the 1960s a local painter and decorator was hired to paint the interior of the theatre.

In order not to disrupt the bingo sessions he opted to work at night.

During the night he was terrified by ghostly goings-on…

He reported feeling like he was being watched all the time although he was totally alone.

He also heard an eerie whispering, the creaking of floorboards as though somebody was approaching him and the box office door banging shut on its own accord.

He even witnessed a semi-transparent object with two dark eye shape patches float across the stage!

 

Meopham

To the south of Gravesend in Kent you’ll find the linear village of Meopham.

Meopham is an ancient village which dates back to 788, the era of the Anglo-Saxon King Offa.

Steele’s Lane and the adjacent green are said to be haunted by the ghost of a young French Woman called Mademoiselle Pinard.

Witnesses who’ve seen her ghostly apparition describe her as wearing an 18th century orange dress.

It’s said that in 1793 a local soldier called Richard Bennett went to France to fight in the Napoleonic Wars.

Whilst in France he met and fell in love with the young Mademoiselle Pinard.

Not wanting to leave her behind he brought her back to England.

Unfortunately for her he didn’t tell her that he was in fact already married!

Upon arriving back to Meopham Richard decided to keep with his wife and abandoned Mademoiselle Pinard.

Unable to cope with being left all alone in a foreign country Mademoiselle Pinard hanged herself in Steele’s Lane.

Now her ghost is said to haunt the lane and the nearby village green!

The narrow lanes surrounding the village are said to be haunted by the ghost of a smiling beautiful red headed girl.

Witnesses describe her as wearing 60s style flared jeans, a sheepskin coat, a tie-dyed dress and carrying a satchel over her shoulder!

In 1850 a miller called Bob Bennett sadly committed suicide by hanging himself from a beam in a barn situated in the village.

That barn is now said to be haunted by his ghost!

Another apparition of Meopham which is often seen walking towards the village church is that of a ghostly monk.

Shocked witnesses describe him as being headless!

 

Dean Manor, Meopham

Along Dean Lane in Meopham you’ll find a property called Dean Manor.

The Grade II listed building dates back to the 15th century.

It’s said that a young servant girl hanged herself in the granary after she was accused of theft by her mistress.

One of the owners of the house in the 1930s packed up and moved out only after six months because of the paranormal activity he’d witnessed in the property.

The manor house became infamous in 1936 after the BBC broadcasted a live radio show of an investigation by the famous ghost hunter Harry Price and Professor Cyril Joad.

The findings were inconclusive and received mixed responses from the listeners.

Since that investigation a few paranormal groups have try to investigate the manor house but subsequent owners have refused permission to do so saying they didn’t want the publicity!

 

Ye Olde Leather Bottle, Northfleet

At the beginning of Dover Road in Northfleet you’ll find Ye Olde Leather Bottle pub.

The pub dates back to 1706 and over the centuries has earned a reputation for being haunted…

Members of staff have reported sudden temperature drops, cold drafts and object being thrown to the floor by unseen hands.

The upper floor of the pub is said to be haunted by the ghost of a former serving maid.

Whilst the bar area is said to be haunted by the ghost of a man who’s said to have killed himself a couple of centuries ago by leaping into a deep pit.

Spooked witnesses who’ve seen the ghostly man describe him as being tall, dressed in black and having long hair!

His ghostly apparition is seen more often than the ghost of the serving maid.

 

Oxney Bottom

Oxney Bottom is located along the Dover Road between the Kent towns of Deal and Dover.

The area is infamous for its Grey Lady ghost who hobbles across the Dover Road scaring drivers half to death.

In some cases, she’s actually been blamed for causing accidents!

Spooked witnesses describe her as being a sad looking old woman who’s dressed in grey.

In 1967 it was claimed that the ghostly Grey Lady actually boarded a local double-decker bus and made her way up the stairs to the top deck.

The bus’s conductress followed her to collect the fair but when she reached the top deck it was completely empty!

This freaked the conductress out as the bus hadn’t actually stop to let anybody off!

The woodlands around Oxney Bottom in Kent are said to be haunted by the ghost of a highwayman.

Legend says the son of a Dover innkeeper decided to become a highwayman.

And he hid in the woods around Oxney Bottom waiting for stage coaches which carried wealthy passengers heading for Dover.

Armed with a pistol, he would stop the coaches and rob the passenger of their jewellery and money.

Like most highwaymen of the time, he was eventually apprehended by the law and later tried for his crimes.

It’s said he was hanged near the site where he committed most of his robberies.

And now his ghost haunts the surrounding woodland!

 

Higham Park, Patrixbourne

About three miles to the south-east of Canterbury in Kent you’ll find a rural village called Patrixbourne.

The village it very old, there’s an Anglo-Saxon cemetery situated in the south of the village on the Bifrons estate.

And the village was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as belonging to Bishop Odo.

On the outskirts of the village you’ll find the Grade II* listed neoclassical style Higham Park house.

In the early 20th century Higham Park was the home of the wealthy eccentric racing driver Count Louis Zborowski.

He tragically died at the age of twenty nine whilst driving in the 1924 Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

His Mercedes-Benz car ploughed into a tree killing him instantly!

It’s said that his ghost now haunts Higham Park house.

Witnesses have reported hearing the phantom sounds of one of his cars tearing up the driveway of house then stopping to let someone out before racing back down the drive and onto the A2.

Apparently, when the car stops to let its passenger out, the doors of Higham Park’s Green Room suddenly fling themselves open!

 

Old Soar Manor, Plaxtol

Located along Old Soar Road on the outskirts of the Kent village of Plaxtol, you’ll find a historic property called Old Soar Manor.

The Grade I listed building dates back to the 13th century and is owned by English Heritage but run by the National Trust.

The manor was built in 1290 for the Culpepper family but the great hall was demolished in 1780 and replaced by a red-brick farmhouse.

Today, the solar, latrine and chapel are all that remain of the medieval manor house.

Old Soar Manor has a ghostly tale to tell…

It’s said to be haunted by the ghost of an 18th century milkmaid who worked for the Geary family.

She was said to have been attacked by the family priest resulting in her becoming pregnant.

Suspiciously, she was found drowned in the church font.

Many thought she’d committed suicide and for this reason her body was buried in un-consecrated ground.

Her ghost is now said to haunt both the farmhouse and the chapel!

A woman’s phantom footsteps have been heard pacing around the properties.

And sudden temperature drops and lights turning themselves on and off have also been reported by spooked witnessed.

In 1972 a ghostly apparition of a priest was witnessed in the chapel.

 

Ellington Park, Ramsgate

Along Park Road in the centre of Ramsgate you’ll find Ellington Park.

Ellington Park is said to be haunted…

From the 17th century to the 19th century there was a mansion on the site which belonged to the Sprackling family.

In the mid-1600s the house was residence to Adam Sprackling.

He was an extremely violent alcoholic who in a drunken rage killed his wife Katherine with a meat cleaver.

He then went on to behead all six of the family dogs!

He was later found hiding in a small underground cave by the local Law Officers.

They arrested him and he later faced trial at Sandwich where he was found guilty of murder and sentenced to death by hanging.

Ellington Park was bought by Ramsgate Council in 1892 and the mansion house was demolished.

The park was said to be haunted by the ghost of Katherine together with her six headless dogs.

Whilst the mansion was standing, witnesses would report seeing Katherine’s ghostly apparition roaming the local area but since the house was demolished no sightings have been reported.

But visitors to the park have reported hearing the ghost of Katherine crying out for mercy!

 

Reculver Fort, Reculver

You’ll find the Kent coastal village of Reculver about three miles to the east of Herne Bay.

During the conquest of Britain the Romans built a small fort in the area which they later extended to a much larger full-size fort in the 3rd century.

The fort was called Regulbium and it guarded the northern entrance to the Wantsum Channel from Saxon raiders.

Today, the eastern gateway, a guard post and the eastern wall are all that remains of the Roman fort.

In 669 an Anglo-Saxon monastery was founded on the site and the church of St Mary was constructed.

In the 12th century the church was remodelled and two towers were added.

The medieval church was partly demolished in 1805 but the twin towers were left.

Today, both the remains of the Roman fort and the twin towers have a reputation for being haunted…

Ancient babies’ remains have been unearthed by archaeologists in the grounds of the Roman fort and in the foundations of it’s walls.

It’s believed that the babies were buried in the buildings as ritual sacrifices!

Spooked witnesses have reported hearing phantom babies crying when they’ve visited the Roman fort area.

The ghostly apparitions of Roman soldiers have also been witnessed patrolling and standing duty at the Roman fort site.

There’ve been reports of spooky hooded figures which float above the ground being spotted between the twin towers.

And on the cliff’s edge next to the twin towers witnesses have reported seeing a ghostly sword fight taking place between a smuggler and a custom’s officer.

The ghosts of a monk, a middle aged woman and the sounds of phantom horses galloping away have been reported at the site too.

Local residents say that the dykes in the area are also haunted by ghosts!

One dark night a couple was driving along Reculver Lane which leads up to the twin towers when the driver had to brake suddenly because a semi-translucent man crossed in front of his car and disappeared into a nearby hedgerow.

The ghostly man was described as wearing a dark overcoat with a pointed hat!

 

Saltwood Castle, Saltwood

About a mile to the north of the Kent town of Hythe you’ll find the village of Saltwood.

The village is home to the 12th century Saltwood Castle.

It’s actually believed that there was a castle on the site as far back as 488 when Aesc the son of Hengist, the King of Kent built one there.

The present day castle is known as the site where the plot was hatched by Reginald fitzUrse, Hugh de Morville, William de Tracy and Richard le Breton to murder Thomas Becket in 1170.

Today Saltwood Castle is owned by the Clark family.

The late Tory MP Alan Clark who was a junior minister in Margaret Thatcher’s governments is buried in the grounds.

Alan Clark’s wife Jane reported that she’d witnessed the ghostly apparition of a monk in one of the castle’s bedrooms.

The castle’s library is also said to be haunted by a ghostly Grey Lady!

 

Sarre Windmill, Sarre

You’ll find the Kent village of Sarre located along the A28 between Canterbury and Margate.

The ancient village is home to a historic Grade II listed smock mill.

The windmill was built in 1820 by the Canterbury millwright John Holman.

It was in operation up until 1940 but later fell into a semi-derelict state.

Between 1983 and 1991 it was finally restored to its former glory by Malcolm Hobbs.

It was then opened to the public as a working mill, museum and tearooms.

During this time the windmill got a reputation for being haunted by the friendly ghost of a former miller.

Spooked witnesses reported hearing phantom footsteps walking around the mill’s empty upper floors.

The windmill’s tearooms were also said to be haunted.

Visitors to the tearooms reported seeing the apparition of a young girl in a period dress sitting at a table waiting to be served!

Today you can visit the two upper floors of the windmill but the ground floor and tearooms have now been transformed into holiday cottages.

 

Ightham Mote, Ightham

To the east of Sevenoaks you’ll find a village called Ightham.

In the Kent countryside to the south of the village is a stunning National Trust property called Ightham Mote.

The Grade I listed moated manor house dates back to 1320.

Legend says that the house is haunted by a Grey Lady.

The Grey Lady is said to be the ghost of the staunch catholic Dame Dorothy Selby.

It’s said that she heard about the 1605 plot to blow up Parliament by Guy Fawkes and sent a letter to warn her cousin Lord Monteagle not to attend Parliament on 5th November.

The letter fell into the wrong hands resulting in the plot being stopped and the conspirators arrested.

Unhappy friends of the plotters heard about Dame Dorothy’s letter and as retribution bricked her up in a secret room at the manor house and left her to die!

In 1870 the owners of the manor were fed up with the coldness in the tower bedroom and ask workmen to investigate why.

During their work they discovered a small space behind the wall panels and found the skeleton of a woman in it.

To this day the tower bedroom is still said to be unearthly cold!

There’s another ghost story associated with the manor house…

In 1552 Sir Thomas Browne was a resident at Ightham Mote.

It’s said that his priest had an affair with a serving girl.

Sadly the priest killed himself due to the scandal the affair caused.

And to punish the girl, Sir Thomas had her killed and then bricked up behind a wall at the manor.

Some believe that the Grey Lady is the ghost of the bricked up serving girl and not the ghost of Dame Dorothy!

After the Wars of the Roses a trap door was fitted into the floor of the tower room.

It’s said that any undesirable visitor to the manor would be dropped through the trap door into the darkness beneath it and left to die.

The room above the main gate is now said to be haunted by the ghost of one of those undesirable visitors!

 

The Old Rectory, Southfleet

Along the Hook Green Road in the Kent village of Southfleet you’ll find two private properties called Friary Court and the Old Friary.

Before the 1950s the properties were actually one whole rectory.

The Grade II listed building dated back to the 14th century and had a few ghostly tales to tell…

The old rectory sat on the site of an ancient friary.

During the medieval times it’s said that three nuns were caught in the act with some monks from the friary.

As a punishment all three women were bricked up in the building’s cellar and left to starve to death.

During the 19th century the ghost of one of the nuns was said to haunt the old rectory.

Her ghost was described as being a short plump woman who was dressed in a brown habit!

A ghostly monk was also said to haunt the old rectory.

It’s said that his body was found in a tomb under some rubble by the west door of the nearby church.

An inscription on the tomb’s lid said the monk was excommunicated!

Another ghost that was said to haunt the rectory was that of a nurse from the mid-19th century.

Apparently there was a scandal when she tried to fiddle the will of a sick patient to her favour.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen many times in the Monk’s Room and also in the corridor outside the room.

She’s been described as wearing a staff nurse’s uniform with white cuffs and is carry some papers that look like a will!

Some visitors to the rectory reported that she actually came into their room through a closed locked door and ask them if there was any sickness in the house before she then disappeared into thin air.

 

Combe Bank, Sunridge

Along Combe Bank Drive in the Kent village of Sunridge you’ll find an independent school called Combe Bank.

The school which was founded in 1924 is housed in an impressive Grade I listed Palladian style mansion.

The mansion is old, it dates back to 1720 when it was first built for John Campbell, 4th Duke of Argyll.

Legend says the grounds of the building are haunted by the ghost of Mary Shirley.

She tragically died in a fire at Combe Bank in 1807.

It’s said that the fire was so intense that all that was left of her body was one of her charred thumbs!

Mary’s first husband was Lord Ferrers.

He was hanged at Tyburn for murdering a steward who was going to testify against him in his divorce from his wife Mary.

Just before his hanging, the bitter Lord Ferrers cursed his wife to die a death more painful than his own!

Later in life Mary Shirley went on to become Lady Campbell when she married Lord Frederick Campbell.

But it seems like her first husband’s curse came true when she tragically burnt to death in the fire at Combe Bank.

Some reports from the time actually suggest that she spontaneously combusted!

It’s now said that the ghost of Lady Campbell wanders the grounds of Combe Bank in the middle of the night looking for her lost charred thumb.

 

Cardinal’s Error Pub, Tonbridge

Along Lodge Oak Lane in the market town of Tonbridge you’ll find the Cardinal’s Error Pub.

The pub is well over five hundred years old which makes it one of the oldest buildings within the town.

It was originally a farmhouse called Lodge Oak but was later transformed into a pub in 1949.

The Cardinal’s Error pub has a reputation for being one of the most haunted buildings in Tonbridge.

Cardinal Wolsey was said to have taken refuge here in the days when the building was used as a farmhouse.

A local nun swapped her habit for the Cardinal’s clothing so that he could escape in her clothing.

She was later executed for this subterfuge!

It’s believed that the ghostly woman dressed in a red dress and tall hat seen at the pub was that of the nun in the Cardinal’s clothing.

The Cardinal’s Error is well known for being haunted by the ghost of Nellie.

She was a local farm girl from a couple of centuries ago who was made pregnant by a local lad but was jilted at the altar by him.

Distraught by being jilted on her wedding day she drowned herself in a nearby pond.

Her ghostly apparition was seen sitting in her wedding dress at the bottom of a bed in one of the pub’s bedrooms.

Apparently she sat there for a couple of minutes before disappearing through the bedroom window!

She also been seen walking up to the Cardinal’s Error from the direction of the old pond site.

She said to throw open the pub’s door, enter the pub, slam the door shut behind her and then walk across the barroom.

Her ghost then disappears through the door which leads to the private stairs!

Sightings of these two lady ghosts haven’t been witnessed for many years.

But recently there’s said to be another ghost of an old gentleman who’s said to haunt the area around the fireplace.

Apparently he says ‘Good Morning’ when there are no customers in the pub!

 

Penshurst Place, Penshurst

You’ll find the stunning historic Penshurst Place in the village of the same name to the west of Tonbridge.

Penshurst estate was originally owned by Sir Stephen de Penchester in the 13th century.

And Penshurst Place was built in 1341 by the London merchant and four times Lord Mayor of London Sir John de Poultney.

From 1552 it became the family home of the Sidney family.

The house is said to be haunted by the ghost of Sir Philip Sidney.

He was a well-known poet, courtier, scholar and soldier during the Elizabethan era.

He died of gangrene in 1586 at the young age of thirty one after being shot in the thigh by a Spanish soldier during the Battle of Zutphen.

His ghost is said to wander Penshurst Place and its grounds.

The country house has magnificent Grade I listed formal gardens.

The ghostly apparition of a woman in Elizabethan dress has been seen by spooked witnesses roaming these beautiful gardens!