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3 Haunted Places on the Isle of Portland

| On 30, Nov 2017


AMBERLY CASTLE: A Haunted Castle You Can Actually Stay the Night In!

The Grade I listed 12th century Amberley Castle Hotel is located in the picturesque village of Amberley.

Today, the castle has been transferred into an amazing luxury hotel.

It's said to be haunted by the ghost of a young girl called Emily who committed suicide at the castle.

Her ghostly apparition has been seen by terrified witnesses in and around the Herstmonceux Room!

Click Here to Stay at Amberley Castle


 

The Heights Hotel

The hotel has stunning panoramic views over Chesil Beach, Lyme Bay and Portland Harbour.

The Heights is a very modern hotel so you may be surprised to discover that it’s reputed to be haunted.

Spooked guests have reported seeing a ghostly figure of a woman in Victorian clothing walking along a corridor and disappearing into a bedroom without opening its door!

The hotel is in fact built on land where in Victorian times it was very fashionable to promenade and take in the fresh sea air.

Click Here to Stay at Heights Hotel

 

Portland Castle

The Grade I listed artillery fort dates back to 1541 when it was first built by Henry VIII to protect the Portland Roads anchorage as part of the King’s Device programme.

The castle has been used during the English Civil War, the Napoleonic Wars and both the First and Second World Wars.

Today it’s run by English Heritage and is opened to the public if you fancy having a look around.

With such a historic building you probably won’t be too surprised to discover that certain parts of the castle are said to be haunted.

The kitchen is said to have a strange atmosphere to it.

On one occasion a woman from a re-enactment society took some photographs in the room and was shocked to discover that she’d captured a strange ghostly mist in one of the photos.

On a hot day during a wedding ceremony in 2008, a wedding guest decided to get out of the heat and have a sit down in the cool interior of the castle.

As she entered the kitchen she saw a woman in a long dress bustling about on the far side of the room.

Thinking the woman was preparing food for the wedding she asked her if it was alright if she sat down and rested in the kitchen.

With that the woman turned towards her and then disappeared into thin air!

The castle’s Great Hall is also said to be haunted.

 

 

Members of staff have often reported hearing phantom footsteps, people talking and the sounds of rustling dresses coming from the empty room.

The ghosts of children are said to haunt the castle.

Visiting children have often remarked how they’d enjoyed playing with the little girl at the castle even though there hadn’t been any other child present at the time of their visit.

Staff members have reported feeling somebody little tugging at their clothes but when they look down they see nobody there.

On one occasion, the custodian of the castle saw a blonde haired child about seven years old looking down at her from a window above the gun platform.

Thinking the child had been locked in the room she went to investigate only to find it totally empty!

The two-storey Captain’s House which stands in the castle’s courtyard is also said to be haunted.

The taps in the building have been known to turn themselves on by their own accord.

And on one occasion a visiting journalist put her tape recorder down on a shelf in the cloakroom and was amazed when it turned itself on and started to play!

 

The Verne High Angle Battery

The Grade II listed battery dates back to 1892 when it was first built to protect Portland Harbour.

It was constructed in a disused quarry to keep it out of direct sight of any enemy ships.

The ‘high angle’ refers to the RML 9 inch 12 ton guns which were positioned within the battery.

They were designed to fire shells at a steep angle so that they would drop onto an enemy ship’s unprotected deck where they would cause the most damage.

The battery was decommissioned in 1906 and today it has been left to fall into a state of disrepair.

Locally, the battery’s tunnels have gained the nickname of the Ghost Tunnels because they’re believed to be haunted.

Local children exploring the tunnels have reported hearing ghostly voices, have small stones thrown at them and have seen the ghostly figure of a man standing by the entrance of one of the tunnels.

On a couple of occasions, men exploring the tunnels have reported to have a light bleeding flesh wound suddenly appear on their foreheads!

 
Bibliography
Alex Woodward (2011) Haunted Weymouth. The History Press