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9 Haunted Pubs of Kent

| On 17, Apr 2017

 


The Lower Bell Inn, Aylesford

The Lower Bell Inn is an old pub which dates back to 1865 that you’ll find situated on the North Downs Pilgrims Ways just off the A229.

The building was originally a farm estate’s manager house with stables at the back.

The pub has a reputation for being haunted…

During the 1990s the then manager of the Lower Bell was interviewed by a paranormal TV program.

The poor man divulge that one morning when he was entering the cellar when something unseen suddenly pushed him down the stairs which resulted in him falling badly and breaking his shoulder blade!

He also remarked that the cellar often had cold spots.

And that the lights would switch themselves on and off on their own accord.

The gas in the cellar would also be turned off on its own accord but instead of being only hand tight he found that it had been turned off so tightly that it needed a couple of whacks with a hammer to loosen it!

Click Here to Stay in the Lower Bell Inn

 

The Bowl Inn, Charing

Just off the Stalisfield Road to the north of the Kent village of Charing you’ll find the historic Bowl Inn.

The pub dates back to 1512 when it started life out as a farmhouse.

A former landlady of the Bowl Inn reported that the building had an eerie story attached to it.

She said that the sound of phantom children crying had been heard coming from the pub’s old inglenook fireplace.

Local legend says that when the plague swept through Charing many of its victim’s bodies where flung into the fire!

It’s been reported that the room above the old fireplace have a strange atmosphere to it and may actually be haunted by a ghost.

Click Here to Stay in the Bowl Inn

 

The Ferry House Inn, Harty

You’ll find the isolated Ferry House Inn overlooking the Swale Estuary just to the south of the small hamlet of Harty on the Isle of Sheppey.

The Grade II listed Ferry House Inn dates back to the 16th century when it was first used as a home for the warden of the ferry.

The Ferry House Inn has a reputation for being haunted…

In 1854 a local man called Coleman tragically drowned in the Swale Estuary when his boat capsized.

Paranormal investigators held a vigil at the Inn in 2004.

They recorded eerie banging noises coming from the pub’s cellar as well as capturing a photo of a ghostly man sitting at a table.

They believed that spirit man they’ve photographed was the ghost of the drowned Coleman.

Spooked members of staff have reported that they’ve felt an unseen presence watching them whilst they did their work.

In 2013 the pub held a psychic evening which revealed that the inn had spirits of people who tragically died in a fire which took place at the inn a couple of centuries ago.

Click Here to Stay in the Ferry House Inn

 

The Chequers Inn, Lamberhurst

The Chequers Inn is situated a stone’s throw away from the River Teise in the village of Lamberhurst.

The pub was originally a manor house in 1137 but was converted to an inn in 1414!

The Chequers is said to be haunted by a ghostly woman in red who can only be seen by female members of staff.

She’s been caught peering out of windows by staff members before disappearing into thin air.

She’s believed to be the cause of phantom footsteps which ascended the stairs.

And is also blamed for furniture being mysteriously moved about!

A former barmaid reported that she saw a ghostly apparition of a woman with long dark hair wearing a black top who peer around the dividing doors of the bar after closing time one night.

Room 4 at the inn is believed to be haunted by another ghost…

Guests often complain about the sudden temperature drops in the room as well as the strange tapping noises.

One guest reported that an invisible entity tried to climb into his bed with him in the middle of the night!

 

The Shipwrights Arms, Hollowshore

You’ll find the white timber-framed Shipwrights Arms at Hollowshore, Faversham.

The pub is located on a creek which runs into the River Swale.

The present day Shipwrights Arms dates back to the 17th century but there’s evidence that an earlier building was on the site since the 13th century!

Over the centuries the pub was a favourite with the local fishermen, sailors, smugglers and pirates.

The pub and the adjacent boatyard is said to be haunted by the ghost of a Spanish sailor who leaves a rather rancid smell in the air when his spirit is present.

Legend says that one stormy night in the 1700s a Spanish gallon sunk in the River Swale and the only survivor was the ship’s captain.

He made it onshore and staggered to the Shipwrights Arms for help.

The landlord at the time thought he was another drunken sailor trying to get a drink after hours so just ignored the Spaniard’s pleas for help.

The Spaniard’s dead body was found the next morning outside the pub!

Witnesses who’ve seen the ghostly Spaniard describe him as wearing black and having a haunted look about him.

His ghost has been blamed not only for the bad rancid smell but for causing sudden temperature drops and moving items around the pub.

The ghost of the Spanish captain isn’t the only apparition to have been seen at the pub.

One of the pub’s regulars had a nice chat in the ladies’ cloakroom with a woman wearing a twin-set and pearls called Helen.

The strange thing is, Helen never exited the ladies’ cloakroom and upon further investigation nobody else was found in there!

 

The Eight Bells, Dover

Along Dover’s Cannon Street, just opposite St Mary’s parish church, you’ll find the Eight Bells pub.

The pub resides in part of the former historic Metropole Hotel.

The Metropole was a luxury hotel which opened in 1896 when Dover was one of the wealthiest towns in the UK.

When the converted flats above the Eight Bells pub were empty, passers-by reported hearing the sounds of a woman singing coming from them.

It’s believed that the phantom singing was coming from the ghost of a young lady called Adele.

Adele was a beautiful blonde who was always happy and loved to sing.

She would meet up with her lover at the Metropole Hotel on a regular basis.

When the First World War came along her lover joined the Royal Flying Corps, stopped seeing Adele and married his fiancée.

Adele volunteered as a nurse and left to care for the wounded soldiers on the front line.

She was later killed whilst at the front in Belgium but it’s said that her ghost returned to her much loved Metropole Hotel.

In fact, her former best friend who was a housekeeper at the Metropole once saw her ghost in a room at the hotel.

She rushed towards her and gave her a hug at which time Adele disappeared into thin air!

 

The Dering Arms, Pluckley

Close to the railway station in Pluckley you’ll find the Dering Arms.

The historic building dates back to the 1840s when it was first used as a hunting lodge for the Dering Estate.

Today the Dering Arms is run as a restaurant and a B&B.

The restaurant has a reputation for being haunted by an old lady who sits at a table by one of the windows.

Witnesses have described her as wearing a period style dress with a bonnet and looking very lifelike…

In fact, she looks so lifelike that they only realise that she’s actually a ghost when they see her vanish into thin air right in front of them!

 

The Black Horse Inn, Pluckley

You’ll find the historic Black Horse Inn situated along the Street in the village.

The building dates back to the 1470s when it was first used as a dry moated farmhouse for the Dering family.

The pub like the village has a reputation for being very haunted.

Items of clothing have been reported to mysteriously disappear then reappear at a later date.

And pint glasses would move about on their own accord.

Many people believe that the mischievous spirit responsible for these ghostly pranks is a ghost of a little girl called Jessie.

 

The Blacksmith Arms, Pluckley

The building which was once the Blacksmith Arms is located at the junction of Smarden Bell Road and Smarden Road.

The Blacksmith Arms had a reputation for being haunted by many ghosts…

In fact, its previous names were the Spectre’s Arms and the Ghost’s Arms!

The building is said to date back to the 1300s and later became an alehouse in 1627.

It’s said to be haunted by the ghosts of a small boy, a Tudor maid, a coachman and a cavalier.

When the pub was opened to the public witnesses reported seeing the ghostly coachman staring into the fire of the public lounge.

And the cavalier ghost was said to roam around the upstairs rooms of the pub.

Like many old pubs up and down the country the Blacksmith Arms is sadly no longer trading and is now used as a private residence.

 
Bibliography
Janet Cameron (2012) Haunted Kent. The History Press

 


FEATURED HAUNTED HOTEL: The Arnos Manor Hotel

Along the Bath Road in Bristol you’ll find the Arnos Manor Hotel.

The hotel was first built as a private home for the business merchant William Reeve in 1760.

It was once a girl’s school which was run by nuns and it’s the ghost of one of these nuns that is said to haunt the hotel today.

Local legend says that a nun had committed suicide because she fell pregnant.

To hide the scandal, the other nuns bricked up her body behind a wall at the hotel.

During the Second World War the hotel was bombed by the German Luftwaffe.

The workmen who were sent in to repair the bomb damage area of the hotel uncovered a female skeleton.

Apparently, to avoid delay, the workmen just buried the bones elsewhere within the building!

Since then, poltergeist activity has taken place throughout the hotel.

Terrified guests have also witnessed a ghostly brown figure within the hotel especially within Room 160.

Guests have heard a female voice calling their name and have felt a figure pinning them down whilst they’ve slept in Room 160.

Click Here to Stay in the Arnos Manor Hotel