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3 Haunted Pubs in Pluckley

| On 10, Sep 2017

 


The Black Horse Inn

You’ll find the historic Black Horse Inn situated along the Street.

The building dates back to the 1470s when it was first used as a dry moated farmhouse for the Dering family.

The pub like the village has a reputation for being very haunted.

Items of clothing have been reported to mysteriously disappear then reappear at a later date.

And pint glasses would move about on their own accord.

Many people believe that the mischievous spirit responsible for these ghostly pranks is a ghost of a little girl called Jessie.

 

The Dering Arms

Close to the railway station in Pluckley you’ll find the Dering Arms.

The historic building dates back to the 1840s when it was first used as a hunting lodge for the Dering Estate.

Today the Dering Arms is run as a restaurant and a B&B.

The restaurant has a reputation for being haunted by an old lady who sits at a table by one of the windows.

Witnesses have described her as wearing a period style dress with a bonnet and looking very lifelike…

In fact, she looks so lifelike that they only realise that she’s actually a ghost when they see her vanish into thin air right in front of them!

 

The Blacksmith Arms

The building which was once the Blacksmith Arms is located at the junction of Smarden Bell Road and Smarden Road.

The Blacksmith Arms had a reputation for being haunted by many ghosts…

In fact, its previous names were the Spectre’s Arms and the Ghost’s Arms!

The building is said to date back to the 1300s and later became an alehouse in 1627.

It’s said to be haunted by the ghosts of a small boy, a Tudor maid, a coachman and a cavalier.

When the pub was opened to the public witnesses reported seeing the ghostly coachman staring into the fire of the public lounge.

And the cavalier ghost was said to roam around the upstairs rooms of the pub.

Like many old pubs up and down the country the Blacksmith Arms is sadly no longer trading and is now used as a private residence.

 
Bibliography
Janet Cameron (2012) Haunted Kent. The History Press